Tagged: United States Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • MaximillianGroup 5:12 AM on 26 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Aspen, , , Julia Dault, Marianne Boesky, United States   

    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky 

    Julia Dault at Marianne Boeseky

    Artist: Julia Dault

    Venue: Marianne Boesky, Aspen

    Exhibition Title: More Than Words

    Date: April 26 – June 9, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    20180426-Boesky-011

    Julia Dault at Marianne Boeseky

    Julia Dault at Marianne Boeseky

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky

    Images courtesy of the artist and Marianne Boesky, New York/Aspen. Photos by Object Studies. 

    Press Release:

    Marianne Boesky Gallery is pleased to present More Than Words, Julia Dault’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. The exhibition will feature a new series of sculptures as well as new paintings that, together, capture Dault’s iterative play with color, form, texture, and materials, as well as her ongoing exploration of the creative potential of industrial products. The new works underscore the value of engaging with the intricate, often beautiful, and little-considered systems that lie just beyond any given surface. This idea is also encapsulated in the exhibition title, which references Extreme’s 1991 hit song of the same name and continues Dault’s use of pop culture references in her work.

    Dault is driven by the boundless creative and formal possibilities within the confines of self-imposed rules, which are often determined by the materials and tools with which she is working. This sense of discovery in the seemingly constrained led to Dault’s newest sculptures: abstract compositions inspired by the intricate fretworks of brightly colored PEX tubing that comprise the plumbing systems in our homes and workspaces. This new engagement broadens Dault’s explorations of the tools and materials of other trades exemplified by earlier sculptures made with off-the-shelf Formica and Plexiglas.

    Dault experimented with the polyethylene PEX tubing in her studio, examining what geometric forms emerged as she bent and shaped the material. She then fabricated the sculptures in vividly colored, hand-rolled aluminum, creating patterns that resemble imagined engineering plans and maps of urban spaces. Hung on the wall, the new works reveal the aesthetic potential of these little-considered industrial materials. At the same time, the minimalist forms hearken back to the 1970s-era works of Anthony Caro and Frank Stella, continuing her engagement with the art of the postwar to the postmodern period.

    The exhibition will also feature more than a dozen new paintings that expand on Dault’s interest in layering, patterning, and the interdependence of color and form. As Dault applies and removes coatings of paint with brushes, sponges, combs, and other unconventional tools, new details and optical illusions arise. For example, Total Recall (2017) features a patterned velour atop Dault’s composition of blue and yellow forms; as the viewer moves around it, like a lenticular print, the fabric changes color and appears to rise from the surface. Dault creates similarly unexpected experiences through her use of woven and perforated vinyls and meshes.

    Dault’s experimentations with surface, tactility, geometry, color, and expressive juxtapositions infuse her paintings with vibrant energy that compel the viewer to look closely and discover unexpected moments of visual complexity. As the systems that underpin modern life become more complex, and, by extension, more opaque, Dault’s artworks provide an invitation to engage actively with our everyday surroundings. Quoting philosopher William James, Dault infers: “My experience is what I agree to attend to. Only those items which I notice shape my mind.”

    Link: Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 8:38 AM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , United States   

    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew 

    5

    Artist: Kirsten Pieroth

    Venue: Mathew, New York

    Exhibition Title: Events and Guises

    Date: April 29 – June 3, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    12

    sweep

    3

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew

    Images courtesy of Mathew, New York

    Press Release:

    “…for the lion, as opposed to man, has no need to disguise his actions, he hunts and seizes his prey as himself… the intention, of one body onto another, irreversibly begins with the moment of touch… from then on, man’s desperate attempts at escaping the incorporation into a larger, predatory body leads to the inevitable arrest in life…” (paraphrases from an unknown source, as remembered by the artist)

    Mathew Gallery is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition of works by German artist Kirsten Pieroth in New York.The artist presents a series of new works that mark Pieroth’s longstanding interest in the human condition and its subsequent psychological, physical and communal aspects.

    The central work of the exhibition, Abrasives (Olympus), 2018 comprises of a series of forty-seven pages of the Sunday edition of the German newspaper ‘Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung’, onto which the artist has printed sequences of various objects, food and physical actions (mostly devotional in nature – kneeling or knocking) to record notions of the modern self, as well as the abrasion, both in a metaphorical and in a physical sense, of the modern self in today’s society. Headlining the series is a print of a flow roll massage roller, uncannily resembling a prison bar or cagelike structure, which is printed onto a portrait of the German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, whom the artist has referenced in previous works. Schopenhauer’s well known proclamation of Sunday as the day that exemplifies most the ennui and general boredom of the bourgeois amidst the surplus, is used here by the artist as a backdrop for the piece. The title Olympus might not only refer to the mythological heaven of gods, but also the human condition as seen through various stages of self conditioning. Visually appearing like an overloaded set of scribblings, the piece unfolds like a modern day polyptych. In this vein, the artist’s notion of a contemporary vineyard in the work Grapes (Olympus), 2018 appears in the guise of an electricity mast.

    The dystopian sentiment of Events and Guises is enhanced further by the work Panorama, 2018, made from a washing machine drum, in which an amalgamation of once red, yellow, blue and white lacquer has been splashed onto its interior walls by the physical action of the spin cycle of the machine. Whereas the shutters of the drum raise open, alternating between joy, longing, despair or even more grotesquely, a winged consumer product (as if reimagining one of Hieronymus Bosch’s haunting creatures), the title suggests a panoramic insight into a claustrophobic experience from within the walls of the drum. Based on a washing machine’s promise of continual rejuvenation, a concept similar to that of the fountain of youth, to turn the old, dirty and used back into the new, brilliant and fresh, the artist placed pure colors inside the drum to unhinge this concept by introducing the viewer to a new color scale that has been violently forced to depart from its course of origins by being subjected to the distorting rotations of society’s machineries.

    A similar motif is explored in a series of smaller plaster sculptures, titled Seven Studies for a Mouth and a Hand, 2018. Again, the viewer is confronted with a resonating body, or rather, a body expected to be resonating, albeit silently devouring, thus the objects are an essentially hollow and square embodiment, suspended between predatory desires and despair, abundance and abandonment, lock and release, consuming and being consumed. These rudimentary sculptures appear as figures reduced to grimacing mouth-pieces and what could be seen as jaws. The question that arises with these works, being based on deformed product encasings, is the duality of feeding and eating, as evident in all human interactions and societal endeavours. The roughly patched sculptures offer varying glimpses into the depths of their interior selves, and seem to express various states of need, greed, desire, longing, satisfaction and discontent. Loosely assembled on the floor, they appear like haunting spirits or shades, while a hand that rests amongst them has been reduced to an empty stump.

    The notion of the circular reoccurs throughout the show, and is introduced again in the work Vertigo (It is your flesh that I wear), 2018. For this work the artist has printed a set of mattress bedsprings, stripped bare from their fabric skin, onto a white sheet of paper. The print testifies to the rather inquisitory nature of the inner workings of an object outwardly designed for recline, rest and recovery. Presented upright, an invisible self seems embossed into the matrix of an industrial landscape, and the skeletal physicality of the structure echoes a sense of trembling and anxiety by lacking a clear focal point, as if in constant motion blur.The tilted object, with its diminishing contours, stands here like a fragile frame for a vanished figure, a body that cannot be recovered. The paper itself, acting like a bedsheet with stains, creases and holes, suggests the violation on the human condition performed by the taste of metal.

    The artist’s acute sense for the implications of materials becomes further elaborated in Neuköln, 2018. For this, the artist gathered preowned wooden floorboards and roof construction materials in Berlin to build a bench, a work that alludes to a series of early works by the artist and is a recurring motif in her practice. The notion of imported, often exotic woods is here manipulated to the abject, given the rather desolate condition of the boards and their original location in one of Neukölln’s worker’s housings. By physically raising the boards to a higher level, the work not only prepares the ground itself while questioning concepts of our human need for settlement, but also elevates the evolutionary process from the hunter and gatherer to the bourgeois onto a questionable pedestal.

    Paul Francis

    The text follows a conversation with the artist.

    Link: Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 8:57 AM on 23 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 47 Canal, Cici Wu, , , , United States   

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal 

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Artist: Cici Wu

    Venue: 47 Canal, New York

    Exhibition Title: Upon Leaving the White Dust

    Date: April 18 – May 27, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Images courtesy of 47 Canal, New York

    Press Release:

    Waking up in the morning, I find myself in a field of white dust. From night to dawn, between loving and being loved, two sides in a coin toss, both ends of a rope, I wandered. At least there are plural entrances to take you into the white dust, such as language, memory, communication, and consciousness.

    I enter the white dust through a kind of cinematic condition, as if I’m hypnotized. Before I entered, I had imagined an empty and dark room before me. In a relaxing state, I curl my legs up on a chair, and warmly watch something. I don’t want to move around, a feeling of emptiness and idleness: I dream, not by the effect of the content of the film played in the theater, rather, I start to dream unwittingly before becoming a spectator. The film opens with a young woman. An unforeseen experience during her young adulthood causes her to lose all memory, and lose at the same time her capacity for speech. Her anonymity gives the character a possibility of multiple identities: young girl at the cinema, maid crouching on the ground her back turned, merchant woman on ferry, market place, orphan, nation, a historical condition, Mother, Memory.

    In the darkness, I see the look of myself leaving. I bring both of my bodies out of the white dust. A narcissistic body of being loved by you which is looking, lost in materializing the structure of the film through gazing into the mirror, and a perverse body of loving you, ready to contain and absorb not the image of the film, but precisely that which exceeds it: grain of sound, sigh of subtitles, and rays of light.

    Upon Leaving the White Dust is a situation created by distance, my last temporary state of being with the unfinished film White Dust from Mongolia (1980) by artist Theresa Hak Kyung Cha (1951-1982). It perhaps will always stay at the “temporary state of being with”, crude and open, as if the moment of leaving a movie theater could actually be pulled very very long.

    The place where the narrative takes place is in China, where many Koreans received asylum during the Japanese occupation of Korea from 1909 to 1945.

    The main character in the story is a young woman, Korean by birth and living in China.

    Having been forced to leave her native country as an immigrant to China, where again the Japanese had, by their law, enforced their language, she is doubly displaced. She is not permitted to speak her language to begin with, then finally, she ceases to speak at all…

    All the elements are historical to lessen the physical geographical distance as well as the psychological distance of the Asian people from other ethnic cultures. The causes for the Korean War, and the reasons for the division of Korea into North and South, and the perpetuating conditions of Cold War will contribute to the understanding of Korea and Asia as whole cultures, not merely state their economic and political status as nations.

    MEMORY as a collective source, as almost having physical and organic dimensions, where space and time superimpose within it. It represents a body of time, units in time inside the time mass that is eternal and immeasurable, within which our existence is marked like a wound.[1]

    Special thanks: Margaret Lee, Oliver Newton, Jamie Kenyon, Terence Chan, Jeremiah Atwell, Jordan Smith, Jiangshengyu Pan, Xiaofei Mo, Jane DeBevoise, Taro Masushio, Seon Young Park, Tae Yeon Kim, Wang Xu, Amy Lien, Dachal Choi, Emily Wang, Jihyun Hong, Sculpture Space and Roland Barthes.

     

    [1] 1980. White Dust from Mongolia contains a film and a historical novel, neither were completed. Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive.

    Link: Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 12:28 PM on 22 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , United States   

    Adrian Piper at MoMA 

    Adrian Piper, Safe #1–4 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #4 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.

    Artist: Adrian Piper

    Venue: MoMA, New York

    Exhibition Title: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016

    Date: March 31 – July 22, 2018

    Note: The full press release is available for download here .

    Click here to view slideshow

    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.

    Adrian Piper, Decide Who You Are #1: Skinned Alive. 1992. Screenprinted images and text on three sheets of paper, mounted on foam core 72 × 42 in. (182.8 × 106.7 cm); 72 × 63 in. (182.8 × 160 cm); and 72 × 42 in. (182.8 × 106.7 cm). Collection Margaret and Daniel S. Loeb. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin

    Adrian Piper. What It’s Like, What It Is #3. 1991. Video installation. Video (color, sound), constructed wood environment, four monitors, mirrors, and lighting, dimensions variable. Installation view in Dislocations, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, October 20, 1991–January 7, 1992. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired in part through the generosity of Lonti Ebers, Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis, Candace King Weir, and Lévy Gorvy Gallery, and with support from The Modern Women’s Fund. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Adrian Piper. What It’s Like, What It Is #3. 1991. Video installation. Video (color, sound), constructed wood environment, four monitors, mirrors, and lighting, dimensions variable. Installation view in Dislocations, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, October 20, 1991–January 7, 1992. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired in part through the generosity of Lonti Ebers, Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis, Candace King Weir, and Lévy Gorvy Gallery, and with support from The Modern Women’s Fund. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, LSD Self-Portrait from the Inside Out. 1966. Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm). Emi Fontana Collection. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography by Boris Kirpotin
    Adrian Piper, Recessed Square. 1967. Masonite on wood frame (refabricated 2017). 36 × 36 × 9 in. (91.4 × 91.4 × 22.9 cm). Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography by Timo Ohler
    The Barbie Doll Drawings #20. 1967. From the series The Barbie Doll Drawings. 1967. Rapidograph pen, ink, and/or pencil on thirty-five sheets of notebook paper. 8 1/2 × 5 1/2 in. (21.6 × 14 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of Catie and Donald Marron, The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Carol and Morton Rapp, Richard S. Zeisler Bequest (by exchange), Committee on Drawings and Prints Fund, Riva Castleman Endowment Fund, John B. Turner Fund, and Monroe Wheeler Fund. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography by Peter Butler
    Drawings about Paintings and Writings about Words #5. 1967. Pencil and charcoal on notebook paper. 11 × 8 1/2 in. (27.9 × 21.6 cm). Collection Louise Fishman. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Adrian Piper, Parallel Grid Proposal for Dugway Proving Grounds Headquarters. 1968. Two typescript pages; ink and colored ink on fourteen sheets of paper; architectural tape on acetate over ink on thirteen photostats; and ink on cut-and-pasted map, mounted on colored paper. Detail: Parallel Grid Proposal for Dugway Proving Grounds Headquarters #11, 8 ½ × 11 in. (21.6 × 27.9 cm). Collection Beth Rudin DeWoody. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Catalysis III. 1970. Documentation of the performance. Two gelatin silver prints and text mounted on colored paper. Overall 8 1/2 × 11 in. (21.6 × 27.9 cm). Photographs by Rosemary Mayer. Collection Thomas Erben, New York. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Food for the Spirit #8. 1971. Fourteen gelatin silver prints (reprinted 1997). Each 149/16 × 1413/16 in. (37 × 37.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Family of Man Fund. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography by Jonathan Muzikar
    Adrian Piper, The Mythic Being: I Embody Everything You Most Hate and Fear. 1975. Oil crayon on gelatin silver print. 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm). Collection Thomas Erben, New York. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Self-Portrait Exaggerating My Negroid Features. 1981. Pencil on paper. 10 × 8 in. (25.4 × 20.3 cm). The Eileen Harris Norton Collection © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Funk Lessons. 1983–84. Documentation of the group performance at University of California, Berkeley, November 6, 1983. Color photograph. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography Courtesy of the University of California at Berkeley.
    Adrian Piper, Vanilla Nightmares #12 1986. Charcoal on newspaper. 23 1/2 × 13 1/2 in. (59.7 × 34.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Gwen and Peter Norton. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography by John Wronn
    Adrian Piper, Safe #1–4. 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #1 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Adrian Piper, Safe #1–4. 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #2 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Adrian Piper, Safe #1–4. 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #3 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Adrian Piper, Safe #1–4 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #4 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Adrian Piper, Decide Who You Are #1: Skinned Alive. 1992. Screenprinted images and text on three sheets of paper, mounted on foam core 72 × 42 in. (182.8 × 106.7 cm); 72 × 63 in. (182.8 × 160 cm); and 72 × 42 in. (182.8 × 106.7 cm). Collection Margaret and Daniel S. Loeb. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, The Color Wheel Series, First Adhyasa: Annomayakosha #33. 2000. Digital file for print reproduction. Dimensions variable. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Everything #2.8. 2003. Photocopied photograph on graph paper, sanded with sandpaper, overprinted with inkjet text, 8.5″ x 11″ (21.6 x 27.9 cm). Private Collection. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Adrian Moves to Berlin. 2007. Documentation of the street performance. Video (color, sound), 01:02:42. Video by Robert Del Principe. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Detail: video still at 00:38:09. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Robert Gerhardt.

    Images courtesy of MoMA, New York; Copyright Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin

    Press Release:

    In 1996 Adrian Piper wrote, “It seemed that the more clearly and abstractly I learned to think, the more clearly I was able to hear my gut telling me what I needed to do, and the more pressing it became to do it.” Since the 1960s, this uncompromising artist and philosopher has explored the potential of Conceptual art—work in which the concepts behind the art takes precedence over the physical object—to challenge our assumptions about the social structures that shape the world around us. Often drawing from her personal and professional experiences, Piper’s influential work has directly addressed gender, race, xenophobia, and, more recently, social engagement and self-transcendence.

    Bringing together over 290 works, including drawings, paintings, photographs, multimedia installations, videos, and performances, the exhibition offers a rare opportunity to experience her provocative and wide-ranging artwork. Occupying the Museum’s entire sixth floor and the Marron Atrium, Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions 1965–2016 charts the artist’s five-decade career, including early paintings inspired by the use of LSD; key projects such as Mythic Being (1973), in which Piper has merged her male alter ego with entries from her teenage journals; My Calling (Card) #1 and My Calling (Card) #2 (1986), business card–sized, text-based works that confront the reader’s own racist or sexist tendencies; and What It’s Like, What It Is #3(1991), a large-scale mixed-media installation addressing racist stereotypes, which will be shown in the Marron Atrium.

    The result of a four-year collaboration between the artist, The Museum of Modern Art, and The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, this is the most comprehensive retrospective of Piper’s work to date.

    The exhibition is organized by Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; David Platzker, former Curator, The Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; with Tessa Ferreyros, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

    Link: Adrian Piper at MoMA

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 7:25 AM on 22 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Gordon Hall, , United States   

    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center 

    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center

    Artist: Gordon Hall

    Venue: MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge

    Exhibition Title: The Number of Inches Between Them

    Date: April 17  – May 20, 2018

    Note: Pdf of two-sided poster multiple available for download here .

    Click here to view slideshow

    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center

    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center


    Gordon Hall, The Number of Inches Between Them, 2017 – 2018
, Pigmented cast concrete, color poster multiple, performance, 39 minutes.
 Performers: Mary Bok, Gordon Hall, Mike Peterson, Lou Desautels, Danny Harris
; Video: James Manning

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center
    Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center

    Images and video courtesy of the artist and MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge

    Press Release:

    As a sculptor, performer, and writer, Gordon Hall examines the personal, relational, and political effects of the ways we relate to objects and to each other. Using both abstract forms and re-constructed copies of found objects, the artist asks how we might use such things and how they solicit bodily engagements from us. Ultimately, Hall’s interests lie in the social and political dynamics of these exchanges. The intentional, specific, and enigmatic objects Hall creates are both provocations to performance and allegories for an ethics of relationality. The sculptural objects and the performances that occur with and adjacent to them explore possibilities for an engagement with space, time, and objecthood that seek to model alternative futures.

    The Number of Inches Between Them, the project on view at the List Center, continues a body of work in which Hall creates replicas of found, one-of-a-kind pieces of furniture. The replicas refer to objects Hall has encountered by chance and feels a magnetic attraction to, furniture that the artist wants to investigate physically through remaking. The Number of Inches Between Them doubles a geometric stone bench happened upon in a friend’s backyard in 2016. The replication is done twice: first as eight cast concrete interlocking panels that are shown assembled as a twin of the bench, and second as the same set of eight concrete panels presented disassembled and leaning against the walls of the gallery. All aspects of the object—its design, tactile quality, material, history, and the narrative of its maker—become implicated in the ways Hall reanimates it in a second life as sculpture. Here, the artist recovers the story of the bench’s creator Dennis Croteau, a largely unknown artist who designed and fabricated the original bench shortly before passing away from complications relating to AIDS in 1989. A movement piece using the bench is performed by Hall and a group of Boston-based performers midway through the exhibition. The two sculptures in the exhibition are accompanied by a takeaway poster featuring an image of the original bench where it sits today, with an undeliverable letter from Hall to Croteau printed on its reverse.

    The title of the work originates from a quote by Scott Burton, an artist who rose to prominence in the 1980s, recognized primarily for complicating the distinctions between sculpture and furniture. His granite and bronze furniture pieces are now included in major public art collections around the world. Here at MIT, Burton designed the settee, bench, and balustrade just outside of the Bakalar Gallery in the atrium of the List Center’s Wiesner Building. Burton, an advocate for making art personal and social, once said of the experience he desired for the seated audiences of his Behavior Tableaux works, “…what I want people to become aware of is the emotional nature of the number of inches between them.” Like Croteau, Burton also passed away from AIDS-related complications in 1989. In creating a space of repose, The Number of Inches Between Them supports us in being present with those who no longer are. Hall produces a bench in this lineage, while considering vulnerability and care, the broader history and politics of support, and the structures that dictate the choreography of our bodies as we engage with the built world.

    Link: Gordon Hall at MIT List Visual Arts Center

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 5:10 AM on 19 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Anglim Gilbert, , , Lynn Hershman Leeson, , United States   

    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert 

    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert

    Artist: Lynn Hershman Leeson

    Venue: Anglim Gilbert, San Francisco

    Exhibition Title: A Manual for Automatons, Bionic Beings and Cyborgs, 1962–1982

    Date: April 26 – May 26, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert

    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert

    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert
    Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert

    Images courtesy of Anglim Gilbert, San Francisco

    Press Release:

    Anglim Gilbert Gallery is pleased to announce a solo presentation of works from 1962 to present
    by maverick, new media artist Lynn Hershman Leeson. The exhibition will feature recently
    rediscovered early works from Hershman Leeson’s studio, most never before exhibited. Presaging
    innovations in her later work, these drawings, collages, and electronic sculptures introduced
    themes carried through five decades.

    Lynn Hershman Leeson has examined the defining elements of human identity as it evolved
    from the societal upheaval of the ‘60s and ‘70s. From a feminist point of view, Hershman Leeson
    created and performed works that illuminated a changing environment influenced by television,
    advertising, and new media. One of the first artists to utilize video and advancing computer
    technology, she has consistently engaged machines and new technologies as both her artistic
    medium of choice and as imagery for changing human identity. For over 50 years Hershman
    Leeson has steadily produced groundbreaking, interactive artworks and “virtual” identities.

    Lynn Hershman Leeson will have a solo exhibition at Haus der Elektronischen Künste (HeK) in
    Basel, Switzerland from May 3 – August 5, 2018 and two of her films will screen at Art Basel on
    June 13 and 14, 2018. Her retrospective exhibition CIVIC RADAR, organized and produced in 2014
    by the ZKM (Center for New Media Art), Karlsruhe, Germany, acknowledged her contribution to
    the global new media arts community and was enthusiastically received as it evolved into other
    museum presentations including Modern Art Oxford, the Lehmbruck Museum, and the
    Deichtorhallen Hamburg/Sammlung Falckenberg. Providing an overview of her pioneering work in
    video, film, and web-based art, the exhibitions earned wide critical acclaim and spurred accessions
    by international museums.

    Hershman Leeson is featured in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco
    Museum of Modern Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and Tate Modern, among others. She
    was the recipient of a Siggraph Lifetime Achievement Award, Prix Ars Electronica Golden Nica,
    and a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. In 2017 she received a USA
    Artist Fellowship and the San Francisco Film Society’s “Persistence of Vision” award. In February
    2018 she was awarded the College Art Association’s “Distinguished Feminist Award” and the
    National Women’s Caucus for Art “Lifetime Achievement Award.”

    Link: Lynn Hershman Leeson at Anglim Gilbert

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 8:44 AM on 18 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , DOCUMENT, , Paul Mpagi Sepuya, United States   

    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document 

    Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Mirror Study (0X5A1237), 2017, archival pigment print, 34x51-framed_Web

    Artist: Paul Mpagi Sepuya

    Venue: Document, Chicago

    Exhibition Title: Dark Room

    Date: April 14 – May 26, 2018

    Note: A publication associated with the exhibition is available for download here .

    Click here to view slideshow

    Paul Mpagi Sepuya-Dark Room Exhibition 2018-07-Web

    Paul Mpagi Sepuya Exposures (set of 5),2018_001-web

    Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Darkroom (_1990407), 2017, archival pigment print, 20x24-framed_Web

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document
    Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document

    Images courtesy of Document, Chicago

    Press Release: 

    DOCUMENT is pleased to present Dark Room, Paul Mpagi Sepuya’s 2nd solo exhibition at the gallery.

    Paul Mpagi Sepuya’s work is part of a common plea for a sincere regard of feeling and sensuality as tools for photographic inquiry. Touch and distance are formulated as requisite foundations for articulating, linking and retooling elided knowledge structures. Working within the lineage of homoerotic photography, Sepuya crafts unique frameworks for understanding how bodies and subjectivities emerge as actionable properties of entanglements, which result from a cohabitation of haptic visuality and spatial arrangements. What we are presented with are libidinally-charged ecosystems that unfold affects and positions, extending our relationship to the world, and touched bodies, across time and space. (…) – Mark Pieterson

    Link: Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Document

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel