Tagged: Paris Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • MaximillianGroup 10:06 AM on 16 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Agnes Varda, , , , Nathalie Obadia, Paris   

    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia 

    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia

    Artist: Agnès Varda

    Venue: Nathalie Obadia, Paris

    Exhibition Title: A CINEMA SHACK : The greenhouse of Happiness

    Date: April 14 – May 31, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Pano1 copie

    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia

    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia
    Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia

    Images courtesy of the artist and Nathalie Obadia, Paris/Brussels. Photos by Bertrand Huet / tutti image.

    Press Release:

    Galerie Nathalie Obadia is delighted to present A CINEMA SHACK : The greenhouse of Happiness, Agnès Varda’s third solo exhibition at the gallery. The artist has built a greenhouse with partitions and glass walls made of the (real) 35mm film reels from a print of LE BONHEUR (Happiness), the movie she made in 1964. Inside, (fake) sunflowers are cultivated. The Greenhouse of Happiness is her most recent shack after the one showcased at the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain (Paris, 2006), the Lyon Biennale (2009) and the LACMA (Los Angeles, 2013), all made of composite prints of various films.

    My nostalgia for 35mm cinema turned into a recycling whim… I build shacks with the waste reels of my movies. Tossed aside because no longer screened, they become shacks.

    Before, film prints would arrive in projection booths in the form of 5 to 8 rounded metal boxes looking like 4cm-thick cakes. In each box, there would be a metal coil rolling up a 5 to 600-meter film reel: it was the motion picture movie with the soundtrack on the side. The booth projector had two lamps: one would cast the image and the other the sound. Now, movies are carried on digital files, both image and sound, weighing approximately 200gr when non-dematerialized. So loads of coils and film reels were discarded…

    For my movies, as well as Jacques Demy’s, we found ourselves with loads of prints that movie theaters no longer wanted. I like collecting waste and recycling it.

    It is the third shack I build.

    I imagine a specific shape for each of my movies.

    The movie Le Bonheur (Happiness) was the story of a happy couple, embodied by Jean-Claude Drouot, his wife and kids.

    They liked picnics. I shot it in Île-de-France thinking about the impressionist painters, with the music of Mozart in the background.

    The credits were shot next to a field of sunflowers, the flowers of summer and happiness.

    This greenhouse, with its distinctive double-windows, is made of an entire print of the film, 2200 meters, allowing to cover the walls, doors and the roof.

    Visitors will be able to enter in the shack and look closer at the transparent images of the movie. 24 images of the sweet Claire Drouot make up one second of the movie and will cover a surface of 45cm. They will be surrounded by the whole duration of the movie and images of a lost time.

    As for the reel metal boxes, they have become obsolete.

    I like these boxes. I remember when we used to go to the mixing, we had to carry tons of them around (a hundred at least). When we threw them into the trunk, it was like a drum concert: boxes for images, boxes for live dialogues, boxes for music, for noise etc.

    Is it still nostalgia or recycling?

    A royal arch welcomes us into the gallery. It is made of these now empty boxes.

    We enter in the realm of movies’ second life.

    – Agnès Varda

    Link: Agnès Varda at Nathalie Obadia

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 5:41 AM on 6 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Air de Paris, Bruno Serralongue, Christine Jornod, , Elisa Larvego, , Florent Meng, , , Melanie Veuillet, Paris, Samuel Lecocq   

    “Littéralement et dans tous les sens” at Air de Paris 

    Artists: Christine Jornod, Elisa Larvego, Samuel Lecocq, Florent Meng, Mélanie Veuillet

    Venue: Air de Paris

    Exhibition Title: Littéralement et dans tous les sens

    Curated by: Bruno Serralongue

    Date: March 24 – May 19, 2018

    Curated by: Bruno Serralongue

    Click here to view slideshow

    Samuel Lecocq, Fragility and Obsolescence, 2017, HD video, 10 minutes 10 seconds looped

    Full gallery of images, press release, and link available after the jump.

    Images:







    Mélanie Veuillet

    Christelle Jornod
    Elisa Lavergo
    Florent Meng
    Mélanie Veuillet
    Samuel Lecocq

    Images and video courtesy of Air de Paris, Paris. Photos by Marc Domage. 

    Press Release:

    The exhibition Littéralement et dans tous les sens brings together five artist-photographers who studied at some point in their career at the Geneva University of Art and Design (HEAD) where I teach Information/fiction since its creation in 2011. Far from being a retrospective and without attempting to show the diversity and wealth that characterizes the practice of photography at the school, the exhibition, which does not have a specific theme, is intentionally subjective. First shown at Centre de la Photographie Genève by Joerg Bader, it enables me to experiment and by holding another role, allows me to express a certain stance with regard to photography. However, the exhibition Littéralement et dans tous les sens is not a manifesto, although perhaps the title can be read as one. It is an excerpt from a letter by Arthur Rimbaud to his mother and to me, it seemed appropriate for a photography exhibition.

    Photography has often been criticized for being too literal. Even today, a certain element of mistrust prevails with regard to the medium, even if it is no longer viewed in the same terms as it was in the 19th century, when it was criticized not for its inability to choose one element to focus on in a composition, but for describing everything literally, without hierarchy, and with the same precision. For this reason, it could never compete with painting (in other words, a photograph would never be an artistic image). Lots of photographers have literally proved that photography is not painting, in every sense possible. And this demonstration pushed them to define what exactly photography was—sometimes even placing it outside art. For example, in 1981 in the text of the catalogue accompanying the exhibition Ils se disent peintres, ils se disent photographes, Michel Nuridsany quoted a statement made by Christian Boltanski during a discussion about the aforementioned exhibition: ‘Photography is photo journalism, the rest is painting’. As recently as 2006, Jeff Wall admitted that he himself had led a struggle against a certain idea of photography, that of reportage, but that he had lost, that photography is always reportage, and that he felt ‘rather happy to have lost’. Undoubtedly these two artists were referring, each in their own way, to the same thing: that ‘the photographic image that results from the process of recording, is not essentially, a product of the imagination’.

    It’s true. One of photography’s most important operations is certainly not imagination but selection. This occurs at all stages in the production of a photographic image. It begins with the choice of subject, the terrain into which the photographer plans to delve, and continues right up to the moment of the shot and beyond, to all stages of post-production. Every photographic project begins with a decision. Interestingly, the word terrain resonates strongly with the notion of movement. As everyone knows: in order to take photographs, one needs to move. Raising the question as to where. The destination is certainly important but on the condition that this is not the sole criteria of the artwork. I think that none of the five photographers participating in this exhibition was especially interested in depicting the reality of the Alps, Mexico, or a refugee camp in Calais. Of course, by choosing to go to a certain place, their photographs are the record of the specific data of each place. But beyond these specifics, each and every one of these photographers is on a quest to capture the present time, the actuality, and in so doing, they designate the direction of a future, not always a cheerful one for that matter, particularly for the Western world, where incarceration appears as the dominant image of our way of life and it looks as though this is set to last, or so these photographs seem to tell us.

    Mélanie Veuillet in her series Tools of Disobedience photographed objects illegally made by inmates inside Swiss prisons: objects used for comfort, defence, attack or escapism. Samuel Lecocq on the other hand, visits the first and only deradicalization centre in France, where he attempts to understand how enclosure is intended to put offenders back on the right track. But where exactly is this track and which one is the right one? Does it lead through the desert? Is it a path that puts people’s lives at risk as they attempt to migrate to the first world, attracted by its wealth and abundance? This is what Florent Meng seems to suggest in the series realized on the border between Mexico and the US, in the town of Sasabe. Or is it a path that leads to a makeshift camp on the French coast opposite England? Does one need to hurl oneself against the walls of mountains and climb them at the risk of losing one’s life?

    Through their studies, each of these five photographers has learned that the terrain is saturated with media-friendly images and that it is through such images that we read and understand the world. But more important than this, they have learned to combat such representations through a meticulous work on form. It is for this reason that these photographs and video share a certain sense of peace. It is from a boat floating peacefully on the river Loire on a sunny afternoon that a woman’s voice tells us about the deradicalization centre in Samuel Lecocq’s video Fragility and Obsolescence. When people are photographed, they seem relaxed, confident. By choosing to have volunteers pose for photographs alongside refugees in the series Chemin des Dunes, Elisa Larvego voluntarily challenges (our?) police-like tendencies to identify and categorize. The horizontal shots of the Arizona desert by Florent Meng and vertical shots of the Alps by Christelle Jornod are strikingly beautiful. Their clear and limpid composition reinforce the impression of insurmountable barriers.

    We see the world through form. This idea has allowed me to think about fiction in the way that Philippe Dubois imagines it in a text on contemporary photography. For him, fiction is the best way of theoretically apprehending the status of the contemporary photographic image. In this way, photography is no longer the trace of ‘something “that was there” in the real world but something “that is here” in front of us, something we can accept (or reject), not as a trace of something that once was, but for what it is, or more precisely for what it shows itself to be: a “possible world”, neither more nor less, but one which exists in parallel with the real or actual world’. (3). Here, it’s about not forgetting the representation of the actual world. Or rather, it’s about not leaving the representation of the actual world to those who rely on ‘it was’. It’s about opening up, in every sense of the word, the scope of perspectives and thinking about what constitutes the world. This is something done by all five of these artist-photographers.

    Bruno Serralongue

    (1) Jean-François Chevrier, ‘Documents de culture, documents d’expérience’ in Communications. Des faits et des gestes, no.79, Paris: Seuil, 2006, p. 63. The quotations by Jeff Wall are taken from the same issue of Communications, p. 187.
    (2) At the time of writing this text, I was reading a book by the philosopher Christiane Vollaire: Pour une philosophie de terrain. Taking inspiration from certain philosophers who had abandoned the ivory tower of philosophy for sociology and a commitment to action on the ground (Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Simone Weil), she gives a brilliant and sensitive analysis on the motivations behind such a transition, of this descent towards the terrain, which she herself experienced. My insistence on the notion of ‘terrain’ owes much to her book.
    (3) Philippe Dubois, ‘De l’image-trace à l’image-fiction. Le mouvement des théories de la photographie de 1980 à nos jours’ in Etudes Photographiques, no. 34, 2016, p.60.

    Link: “Littéralement et dans tous les sens” at Air de Paris

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 9:17 AM on 5 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Freedman Fitzpatrick, Hannah Weinberger, Paris   

    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick 

    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick

    Artist: Hannah Weinberger

    Venue: Freedman Fitzpatrick, Paris

    Exhibition Title: Day by Day, Night by Day

    Date: April 6 – May 27, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick

    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick

    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick
    Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick

    Images courtesy of Freedman Fitzpatrick, Paris

    Press Release:

    For her first solo exhibition in Paris, Day by Day, Night by Day, Weinberger has transformed the gallery space into a perpetual opening. Collapsing the traditional dynamic of the gallery space as a place of celebration on opening night and then a place of refined quiet visitation every other day thereafter. Visitors are invited to come in, post up at the bar, grab a beer, listen to the radio, and turn the gallery into a space for conversation.

    Illuminating the bar is a series of light boxes drawn from Weinberger‘s video work, which loops from the boudoir gallery in the back. The sound of Weinberger’s video floods into the front gallery space, as the radio and chatter of visitors floods into the back. The solemnity of art viewership is broken down, and visitors are entreated to the experience of being inside of, and communally altering, a subtly shifting soundtrack.

    For Weinberger, sound begins with the incidental background noises generated by social gatherings. The atmospheric hums that people make while seated at tables with glass and metal at their fingertips. The percussion of people moving in small formations, thumping the floor with their feet and clapping their hands to synthetic beats. Her compositions streamline social cacophony into minimal soundtracks, unburdened by dramatic crescendos, referential tempos, and algorithmic feats.

    Like a favorite pop song that unleashes memories whether its played on the radio or belted out by a group of friends at a karaoke bar, Weinberger’s ephemeral installations manifest a universal intimacy.

    Link: Hannah Weinberger at Freedman Fitzpatrick

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 10:24 AM on 3 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Emanuel Rossetti, , , Paris, Sundogs   

    Emanuel Rossetti at Sundogs 

    Developments - Emanuel Rossetti-004

    Artist: Emanuel Rossetti

    Venue: Sundogs, Paris

    Exhibition Title: Developments

    Date: April 7 – May 5, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Developments - Emanuel Rossetti-002

    Developments - Emanuel Rossetti-012

    Developments - Emanuel Rossetti-010

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Emanuel Rossetti at Sundogs
    Emanuel Rossetti, Perfect Square Vomitory, 2018, 
Oriented strand boards, wood, screws, felt and acrylic paint
500 x 250 x 26.8 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, Stairs, 2018, Lambda C-print, mounted and framed
40.5 x 40.5 x 1 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, Stand, 2018, Lambda C-print, mounted and framed
40.5 x 40.5 x 1 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, Development, 2018, Lambda C-print, mounted and framed
40.5 x 40.5 x 1 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, Stairs, 2018, Lambda C-print, mounted and framed
40.5 x 40.5 x 1 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, Garden, 2018, Lambda C-print, mounted and framed
40.5 x 40.5 x 1 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, Duct, 2018, 
Lambda C-print, mounted and framed
40.5 x 40.5 x 1 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, Memorial, 2018, 
Lambda C-print, mounted and framed
40.5 x 40.5 x 1 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, Piccolo, 2018, 
Lambda C-print, mounted and framed
40.5 x 40.5 x 1 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, Gallery Bells, 2018, 
Yamaha DSR-2000 FM keyboard, Klinger Organ MIDI Reader, Standard MIDI File
(La Sonnerie de Sainte-Geneviève du Mont de Paris by Marin Marais), cables, zip ties
ca. 100 x 500 x 200 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, Pair, 2018, 
Duratrans, LED light box
    Exhibition soundtrack for Developments, performed, recorded, mixed and mastered by
Emanuel Rossetti
    Emanuel Rossetti, Stairs, 2018, 
Lambda C-print, mounted and framed
40.5 x 40.5 x 1 cm
    Emanuel Rossetti, 
Stairs, 2018, 
Lambda C-print, mounted and framed
40.5 x 40.5 x 1 cm

    Images courtesy of Sundogs, Paris

    Press Release:

    Photography has made a consistent appearance in Emanuel Rossetti’s practice. At times, he anonymized the photographic element by using it as a fragment in virtual compositions or turning it into a background. “Developments” presents the photographic image on its own. It has pushed its way back to the foreground.
    In the last instance where he exhibited photography as photography, a series of glacial erratics (“Findlinge”) were shown. But that was years ago. In part, he was interested in how the “Findlinge”—large rocks transported by glaciers—are moved and used to demarcate urban space in Switzerland.

    Since then, he continuously made use of found objects to signal spatial limitations and, concurrently, interfere with them. For example, his repeated use of bells, and the sound they make has become a steady part of his repertoire. In Paris, the bells are equally reminiscent of the 1980s and the Baroque.

    But how did the photographic image return to his practice? Although all the exhibited photography was taken during his month-long stay in Paris, the format he chose for them rejects the documentary. By using a ultra wide-angle lens, commonly referred to as “fish eye”—the classic comic means to distort images—he distances himself from the representation of his subjects.

    Taken while roaming through Paris, the pictures depict commonly seen pedestrian details: a fruit stand, staircases, building facades, shop windows, etc; the calculated enumeration of physical surfaces and their perforations. Through this, the artist realizes images that themselves, via the “fish eye” effect, look like holes on black squares.

    Here, I would suggest, the photography reacts to something that is constructed, as opposed to simply taken. Herein lies a contradiction to the reference of the readymade or found object, which links the artist’s use of generic digital renderings (eg. scissors) or drawings. Repeatedly, and with an insisting tone, the artist points to the cut between what’s already there and what has to be made.

    Next to the fish eye photography, Emanuel Rossetti exhibits a painted wooden sculpture, a light box and different sounds emitted from various speakers. The works establish a quasi Lynchian effect that isn’t based on intuition, but rather sequenced through multiple units in a system. And just like that, the work shifts from the realm of the icon to that of the index.

    As an experience, this emphasizes the relationship between the active and residual space and how one moves between them.

    Link: Emanuel Rossetti at Sundogs

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 9:21 AM on 30 April, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Camilla Wills, , , , Gaudel de Stampa, Paris   

    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa 

    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa

    Artist: Camilla Wills

    Venue: Gaudel de Stampa, Paris

    Exhibition Title: Tonight

    Date: March 21 – May 12, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa

    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa

    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa

    Full gallery of images and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa
    Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa

    Images courtesy of the artist and Gaudel de Stampa, Paris

    Link: Camilla Wills at Gaudel de Stampa

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 6:09 AM on 21 April, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Autumn Ramsey, , Crevecoeur, , , Paris   

    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur 

    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur

    Artist: Autumn Ramsey

    Venue: Crèvecoeur, Paris

    Date: March 16 – April 28, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur

    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur

    A 36435

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur
    Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur

    Images courtesy of Crèvecoeur, Paris

    Press Release:

    Ramsey’s exhibition builds on a cultural inclination in Western history that the body is simply one more object among others, part of the physical world, not entirely rational and a source of disruption that needs to be controlled. The social construction of difference that developed from distrust has correlations in ideas of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation and Ramsey’s work uses it to look at the role of tradition in the shaping of contemporary myths.

    Autumn Ramsey’s paintings often use a central image to direct the narrative. In many works, the narrative is iconic, using imagery abstracted from a range of cultural and historic sources. For example, Ramsey’s painting The Sphinx builds directly on Gustave Moreau’s 1864 painting Oedipus and the Sphinx. Moreau’s painting was a fresh treatment of the established subject of the meeting between Oedipus and the Sphinx on the road to Delphi, the mythological story in which Oedipus heroically purges Thebes of the Sphinx – a female monster. Unlike older works, in Moreau’s version, the Sphinx is antagonistic, showing active opposition to Oedipus. Other paintings by Moreau depict a triumphant sphinx atop a mound of victims.

    Ramsey’s sphinxes, birds of prey, and apex predators, consciously feed on other animals, often by force and in the context of her practice they may be understood both as archetypical protectorate totems as well as metaphorical phalluses. Ramsey has situated herself as predator and prey, producer and consumer, and it’s the psychological complexity of the relationships between her characterizations and the play that they make visible that is at the core of her practice. Her work adopts an intentionally symbolic painting style, often with mythological subjects and narratives. Her depictions of the sphinxes in this exhibition for example, especially Red Sphinx takes a female form that lures us into an increasingly complex and compromising situation. The gaze that her works share between figures suggests a mirroring where aspects of the same figure recognize and confront each other.

    Link: Autumn Ramsey at Crèvecoeur

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel