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  • MaximillianGroup 8:38 AM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , New York,   

    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew 

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    Artist: Kirsten Pieroth

    Venue: Mathew, New York

    Exhibition Title: Events and Guises

    Date: April 29 – June 3, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

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    sweep

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    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew
    Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew

    Images courtesy of Mathew, New York

    Press Release:

    “…for the lion, as opposed to man, has no need to disguise his actions, he hunts and seizes his prey as himself… the intention, of one body onto another, irreversibly begins with the moment of touch… from then on, man’s desperate attempts at escaping the incorporation into a larger, predatory body leads to the inevitable arrest in life…” (paraphrases from an unknown source, as remembered by the artist)

    Mathew Gallery is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition of works by German artist Kirsten Pieroth in New York.The artist presents a series of new works that mark Pieroth’s longstanding interest in the human condition and its subsequent psychological, physical and communal aspects.

    The central work of the exhibition, Abrasives (Olympus), 2018 comprises of a series of forty-seven pages of the Sunday edition of the German newspaper ‘Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung’, onto which the artist has printed sequences of various objects, food and physical actions (mostly devotional in nature – kneeling or knocking) to record notions of the modern self, as well as the abrasion, both in a metaphorical and in a physical sense, of the modern self in today’s society. Headlining the series is a print of a flow roll massage roller, uncannily resembling a prison bar or cagelike structure, which is printed onto a portrait of the German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, whom the artist has referenced in previous works. Schopenhauer’s well known proclamation of Sunday as the day that exemplifies most the ennui and general boredom of the bourgeois amidst the surplus, is used here by the artist as a backdrop for the piece. The title Olympus might not only refer to the mythological heaven of gods, but also the human condition as seen through various stages of self conditioning. Visually appearing like an overloaded set of scribblings, the piece unfolds like a modern day polyptych. In this vein, the artist’s notion of a contemporary vineyard in the work Grapes (Olympus), 2018 appears in the guise of an electricity mast.

    The dystopian sentiment of Events and Guises is enhanced further by the work Panorama, 2018, made from a washing machine drum, in which an amalgamation of once red, yellow, blue and white lacquer has been splashed onto its interior walls by the physical action of the spin cycle of the machine. Whereas the shutters of the drum raise open, alternating between joy, longing, despair or even more grotesquely, a winged consumer product (as if reimagining one of Hieronymus Bosch’s haunting creatures), the title suggests a panoramic insight into a claustrophobic experience from within the walls of the drum. Based on a washing machine’s promise of continual rejuvenation, a concept similar to that of the fountain of youth, to turn the old, dirty and used back into the new, brilliant and fresh, the artist placed pure colors inside the drum to unhinge this concept by introducing the viewer to a new color scale that has been violently forced to depart from its course of origins by being subjected to the distorting rotations of society’s machineries.

    A similar motif is explored in a series of smaller plaster sculptures, titled Seven Studies for a Mouth and a Hand, 2018. Again, the viewer is confronted with a resonating body, or rather, a body expected to be resonating, albeit silently devouring, thus the objects are an essentially hollow and square embodiment, suspended between predatory desires and despair, abundance and abandonment, lock and release, consuming and being consumed. These rudimentary sculptures appear as figures reduced to grimacing mouth-pieces and what could be seen as jaws. The question that arises with these works, being based on deformed product encasings, is the duality of feeding and eating, as evident in all human interactions and societal endeavours. The roughly patched sculptures offer varying glimpses into the depths of their interior selves, and seem to express various states of need, greed, desire, longing, satisfaction and discontent. Loosely assembled on the floor, they appear like haunting spirits or shades, while a hand that rests amongst them has been reduced to an empty stump.

    The notion of the circular reoccurs throughout the show, and is introduced again in the work Vertigo (It is your flesh that I wear), 2018. For this work the artist has printed a set of mattress bedsprings, stripped bare from their fabric skin, onto a white sheet of paper. The print testifies to the rather inquisitory nature of the inner workings of an object outwardly designed for recline, rest and recovery. Presented upright, an invisible self seems embossed into the matrix of an industrial landscape, and the skeletal physicality of the structure echoes a sense of trembling and anxiety by lacking a clear focal point, as if in constant motion blur.The tilted object, with its diminishing contours, stands here like a fragile frame for a vanished figure, a body that cannot be recovered. The paper itself, acting like a bedsheet with stains, creases and holes, suggests the violation on the human condition performed by the taste of metal.

    The artist’s acute sense for the implications of materials becomes further elaborated in Neuköln, 2018. For this, the artist gathered preowned wooden floorboards and roof construction materials in Berlin to build a bench, a work that alludes to a series of early works by the artist and is a recurring motif in her practice. The notion of imported, often exotic woods is here manipulated to the abject, given the rather desolate condition of the boards and their original location in one of Neukölln’s worker’s housings. By physically raising the boards to a higher level, the work not only prepares the ground itself while questioning concepts of our human need for settlement, but also elevates the evolutionary process from the hunter and gatherer to the bourgeois onto a questionable pedestal.

    Paul Francis

    The text follows a conversation with the artist.

    Link: Kirsten Pieroth at Mathew

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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  • MaximillianGroup 5:58 AM on 24 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New York   

    : Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance 

    June 3–September 9, 2018

    MOMA

     
  • MaximillianGroup 8:57 AM on 23 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 47 Canal, Cici Wu, , , New York,   

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal 

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Artist: Cici Wu

    Venue: 47 Canal, New York

    Exhibition Title: Upon Leaving the White Dust

    Date: April 18 – May 27, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal
    Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Images courtesy of 47 Canal, New York

    Press Release:

    Waking up in the morning, I find myself in a field of white dust. From night to dawn, between loving and being loved, two sides in a coin toss, both ends of a rope, I wandered. At least there are plural entrances to take you into the white dust, such as language, memory, communication, and consciousness.

    I enter the white dust through a kind of cinematic condition, as if I’m hypnotized. Before I entered, I had imagined an empty and dark room before me. In a relaxing state, I curl my legs up on a chair, and warmly watch something. I don’t want to move around, a feeling of emptiness and idleness: I dream, not by the effect of the content of the film played in the theater, rather, I start to dream unwittingly before becoming a spectator. The film opens with a young woman. An unforeseen experience during her young adulthood causes her to lose all memory, and lose at the same time her capacity for speech. Her anonymity gives the character a possibility of multiple identities: young girl at the cinema, maid crouching on the ground her back turned, merchant woman on ferry, market place, orphan, nation, a historical condition, Mother, Memory.

    In the darkness, I see the look of myself leaving. I bring both of my bodies out of the white dust. A narcissistic body of being loved by you which is looking, lost in materializing the structure of the film through gazing into the mirror, and a perverse body of loving you, ready to contain and absorb not the image of the film, but precisely that which exceeds it: grain of sound, sigh of subtitles, and rays of light.

    Upon Leaving the White Dust is a situation created by distance, my last temporary state of being with the unfinished film White Dust from Mongolia (1980) by artist Theresa Hak Kyung Cha (1951-1982). It perhaps will always stay at the “temporary state of being with”, crude and open, as if the moment of leaving a movie theater could actually be pulled very very long.

    The place where the narrative takes place is in China, where many Koreans received asylum during the Japanese occupation of Korea from 1909 to 1945.

    The main character in the story is a young woman, Korean by birth and living in China.

    Having been forced to leave her native country as an immigrant to China, where again the Japanese had, by their law, enforced their language, she is doubly displaced. She is not permitted to speak her language to begin with, then finally, she ceases to speak at all…

    All the elements are historical to lessen the physical geographical distance as well as the psychological distance of the Asian people from other ethnic cultures. The causes for the Korean War, and the reasons for the division of Korea into North and South, and the perpetuating conditions of Cold War will contribute to the understanding of Korea and Asia as whole cultures, not merely state their economic and political status as nations.

    MEMORY as a collective source, as almost having physical and organic dimensions, where space and time superimpose within it. It represents a body of time, units in time inside the time mass that is eternal and immeasurable, within which our existence is marked like a wound.[1]

    Special thanks: Margaret Lee, Oliver Newton, Jamie Kenyon, Terence Chan, Jeremiah Atwell, Jordan Smith, Jiangshengyu Pan, Xiaofei Mo, Jane DeBevoise, Taro Masushio, Seon Young Park, Tae Yeon Kim, Wang Xu, Amy Lien, Dachal Choi, Emily Wang, Jihyun Hong, Sculpture Space and Roland Barthes.

     

    [1] 1980. White Dust from Mongolia contains a film and a historical novel, neither were completed. Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive.

    Link: Cici Wu at 47 Canal

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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  • MaximillianGroup 12:28 PM on 22 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , New York,   

    Adrian Piper at MoMA 

    Adrian Piper, Safe #1–4 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #4 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.

    Artist: Adrian Piper

    Venue: MoMA, New York

    Exhibition Title: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016

    Date: March 31 – July 22, 2018

    Note: The full press release is available for download here .

    Click here to view slideshow

    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.

    Adrian Piper, Decide Who You Are #1: Skinned Alive. 1992. Screenprinted images and text on three sheets of paper, mounted on foam core 72 × 42 in. (182.8 × 106.7 cm); 72 × 63 in. (182.8 × 160 cm); and 72 × 42 in. (182.8 × 106.7 cm). Collection Margaret and Daniel S. Loeb. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin

    Adrian Piper. What It’s Like, What It Is #3. 1991. Video installation. Video (color, sound), constructed wood environment, four monitors, mirrors, and lighting, dimensions variable. Installation view in Dislocations, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, October 20, 1991–January 7, 1992. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired in part through the generosity of Lonti Ebers, Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis, Candace King Weir, and Lévy Gorvy Gallery, and with support from The Modern Women’s Fund. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck.
    Adrian Piper. What It’s Like, What It Is #3. 1991. Video installation. Video (color, sound), constructed wood environment, four monitors, mirrors, and lighting, dimensions variable. Installation view in Dislocations, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, October 20, 1991–January 7, 1992. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired in part through the generosity of Lonti Ebers, Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis, Candace King Weir, and Lévy Gorvy Gallery, and with support from The Modern Women’s Fund. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, LSD Self-Portrait from the Inside Out. 1966. Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm). Emi Fontana Collection. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography by Boris Kirpotin
    Adrian Piper, Recessed Square. 1967. Masonite on wood frame (refabricated 2017). 36 × 36 × 9 in. (91.4 × 91.4 × 22.9 cm). Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography by Timo Ohler
    The Barbie Doll Drawings #20. 1967. From the series The Barbie Doll Drawings. 1967. Rapidograph pen, ink, and/or pencil on thirty-five sheets of notebook paper. 8 1/2 × 5 1/2 in. (21.6 × 14 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of Catie and Donald Marron, The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Carol and Morton Rapp, Richard S. Zeisler Bequest (by exchange), Committee on Drawings and Prints Fund, Riva Castleman Endowment Fund, John B. Turner Fund, and Monroe Wheeler Fund. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography by Peter Butler
    Drawings about Paintings and Writings about Words #5. 1967. Pencil and charcoal on notebook paper. 11 × 8 1/2 in. (27.9 × 21.6 cm). Collection Louise Fishman. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Adrian Piper, Parallel Grid Proposal for Dugway Proving Grounds Headquarters. 1968. Two typescript pages; ink and colored ink on fourteen sheets of paper; architectural tape on acetate over ink on thirteen photostats; and ink on cut-and-pasted map, mounted on colored paper. Detail: Parallel Grid Proposal for Dugway Proving Grounds Headquarters #11, 8 ½ × 11 in. (21.6 × 27.9 cm). Collection Beth Rudin DeWoody. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Catalysis III. 1970. Documentation of the performance. Two gelatin silver prints and text mounted on colored paper. Overall 8 1/2 × 11 in. (21.6 × 27.9 cm). Photographs by Rosemary Mayer. Collection Thomas Erben, New York. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Food for the Spirit #8. 1971. Fourteen gelatin silver prints (reprinted 1997). Each 149/16 × 1413/16 in. (37 × 37.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Family of Man Fund. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography by Jonathan Muzikar
    Adrian Piper, The Mythic Being: I Embody Everything You Most Hate and Fear. 1975. Oil crayon on gelatin silver print. 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm). Collection Thomas Erben, New York. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Self-Portrait Exaggerating My Negroid Features. 1981. Pencil on paper. 10 × 8 in. (25.4 × 20.3 cm). The Eileen Harris Norton Collection © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Funk Lessons. 1983–84. Documentation of the group performance at University of California, Berkeley, November 6, 1983. Color photograph. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography Courtesy of the University of California at Berkeley.
    Adrian Piper, Vanilla Nightmares #12 1986. Charcoal on newspaper. 23 1/2 × 13 1/2 in. (59.7 × 34.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Gwen and Peter Norton. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Photography by John Wronn
    Adrian Piper, Safe #1–4. 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #1 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Adrian Piper, Safe #1–4. 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #2 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Adrian Piper, Safe #1–4. 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #3 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Adrian Piper, Safe #1–4 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #4 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Adrian Piper, Decide Who You Are #1: Skinned Alive. 1992. Screenprinted images and text on three sheets of paper, mounted on foam core 72 × 42 in. (182.8 × 106.7 cm); 72 × 63 in. (182.8 × 160 cm); and 72 × 42 in. (182.8 × 106.7 cm). Collection Margaret and Daniel S. Loeb. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, The Color Wheel Series, First Adhyasa: Annomayakosha #33. 2000. Digital file for print reproduction. Dimensions variable. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Everything #2.8. 2003. Photocopied photograph on graph paper, sanded with sandpaper, overprinted with inkjet text, 8.5″ x 11″ (21.6 x 27.9 cm). Private Collection. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin
    Adrian Piper, Adrian Moves to Berlin. 2007. Documentation of the street performance. Video (color, sound), 01:02:42. Video by Robert Del Principe. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. Detail: video still at 00:38:09. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.
    Installation view of Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 31–July 22, 2018. © 2018 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Robert Gerhardt.

    Images courtesy of MoMA, New York; Copyright Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin

    Press Release:

    In 1996 Adrian Piper wrote, “It seemed that the more clearly and abstractly I learned to think, the more clearly I was able to hear my gut telling me what I needed to do, and the more pressing it became to do it.” Since the 1960s, this uncompromising artist and philosopher has explored the potential of Conceptual art—work in which the concepts behind the art takes precedence over the physical object—to challenge our assumptions about the social structures that shape the world around us. Often drawing from her personal and professional experiences, Piper’s influential work has directly addressed gender, race, xenophobia, and, more recently, social engagement and self-transcendence.

    Bringing together over 290 works, including drawings, paintings, photographs, multimedia installations, videos, and performances, the exhibition offers a rare opportunity to experience her provocative and wide-ranging artwork. Occupying the Museum’s entire sixth floor and the Marron Atrium, Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions 1965–2016 charts the artist’s five-decade career, including early paintings inspired by the use of LSD; key projects such as Mythic Being (1973), in which Piper has merged her male alter ego with entries from her teenage journals; My Calling (Card) #1 and My Calling (Card) #2 (1986), business card–sized, text-based works that confront the reader’s own racist or sexist tendencies; and What It’s Like, What It Is #3(1991), a large-scale mixed-media installation addressing racist stereotypes, which will be shown in the Marron Atrium.

    The result of a four-year collaboration between the artist, The Museum of Modern Art, and The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, this is the most comprehensive retrospective of Piper’s work to date.

    The exhibition is organized by Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; David Platzker, former Curator, The Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; with Tessa Ferreyros, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

    Link: Adrian Piper at MoMA

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 10:10 AM on 22 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New York   

    : Artist’s Choice: Peter Fischli, “If Everything Is Sculpture Why Make Sculpture?” 

    Ongoing

    MOMA

     
  • MaximillianGroup 8:51 AM on 18 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New York   

    : Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad 

    June 3–September 3, 2018

    MOMA

     
  • MaximillianGroup 6:28 AM on 17 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Lucy Skaer, New York, ,   

    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman 

    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman

    Artist: Lucy Skaer

    Venue: Peter Freeman, New York

    Exhibition Title: Sentiment

    Date: April 19 – June 2, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman

    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman

    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman
    Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman

    Images courtesy of the artist and  Peter Freeman, Inc. Installation photos by Nick Knight.

    Press Release:

    Peter Freeman, Inc. is pleased to present Lucy Skaer: Sentiment, the British artist’s second solo exhibition with the gallery in New York.

    Throughout her practice, in sculpture, print, and film, Skaer mines and manipulates preexisting imagery—from art, from history, and from her own oeuvre and personal history—transforming and destabilizing straightforward readings of the original source material and the resulting works. In this exhibition she explores the role of feeling, emotion and subjectivity in how we experience objects, images, or situations, despite degrees of abstraction or transmutation.

    In La Chasse (2017), abstract sculptures—comprised of elements like ingots and lozenges, forms that Skaer has used in previous sculptures—are adapted to mimic sentient animals. In refiguring the forms as quarry, the subject that the sculpture depicts becomes both less legitimate and more sympathetic. The idea is based in part on miniature illuminations from the Le livre de chasse, a medieval transcript on Renaissance hunting techniques from 1331-1391. Those images of observation, capture and slaughter both create and satisfy desire: the hunted animals appear on the page as if they are already tasty morsels on a plate. Using the analogy of the hunt in sculpture, Skaer draws a parallel between creation and death, animate and inanimate, and legibility and abstraction. Each animal reads as a being, but is nearly unidentifiable save one small realistically-rendered body part or gesture that each bears.

    Also on view is a new series of cast-bronze sculptures, abstract in form and hand-painted to represent the natural elements, rain, snow, and wind for example. Through these representations of fleeting states of weather, Skaer explores how and what can be embodied in form, she plays with how far into abstraction she can venture while leaving some semblance of the thing identifiable, and with that, the sentiment that one ascribes to it from their own experiences. In works from an ongoing project she began in 2012, Skaer uses elements from her childhood home (where her father still resides) such as wooden floor boards, windows and doors and reconfigures them into boxes, cubes, or slabs, embellishing them with fine materials, replacing glass panes with lapis lazuli, and embedding objects from her father’s various collections of disperate objects. She is performing a displacement of memory – her old door is no longer a door and the new door is not the door of her memory. Sentiment in art would seem more concurrent with the year the house was built (c. 1825) than now; however, sentiment in its multiple definitions—as a subjective, deeply personal response, but also as an attachment to an idea that is believed to be true without positive knowledge—has a great deal of relevance in a post-truth era.

    Link: Lucy Skaer at Peter Freeman

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