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  • MaximillianGroup 11:10 AM on 21 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Corvi Mora, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, , London,   

    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora 

    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora

    Artist: Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

    Venue: Corvi-Mora, London

    Exhibition Title: Intensité Assouvissante

    Date: April 4 – June 16,  2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora

    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora

    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster Installation

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora
    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora
    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora
    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora
    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora
    Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora

    Images courtesy of Corvi-Mora, London 

    Press Release:

    Tommaso Corvi-Mora is pleased to present Intensité Assouvissante, an exhibition of new work by French artist Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster.

    The current exhibition has at its core the Apparitions, a series of works that the artist started in 2012. The series consists of a gallery of characters visualized through the use of costumes, wigs and make up. The series has included Edgar Allan Poe, Lola Montez as performed by Martine Carol in Max Ophül’s Lola Montès (1955), Bob Dylan, the character of Vicky Anderson (Faye Dunaway) in The Thomas Crown Affair (1968) and many others. A precursor to the Apparitions was De Novo (2009), shown in this gallery in 2010, a video the artist made for her participation to the 2009 Venice Biennale. In it, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster recounts her experiences of exhibiting in Venice over the years. La Loge (Numéro Rouge) (2018) is a kind of sequel to La Loge (Numéro Bleu), first exhibited at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris in 1993.

    The other work in the exhibition, Textbau (2018), is displayed in the same room where De Novo was screened a few years ago. It shares some of its concerns and subject matter while also touching upon new autobiographical elements.

    Link: Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster at Corvi-Mora

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 12:28 PM on 15 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , London, Magali Reus, South London Gallery,   

    Magali Reus at South London Gallery 

    Magali Reus at South London Gallery

    Artist: Magali Reus

    Venue: South London Gallery

    Exhibition Title: As mist, description

    Date: March 23 – May 27, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Magali Reus at South London Gallery

    Magali Reus at South London Gallery

    Magali Reus at South London Gallery

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery
    Magali Reus at South London Gallery

    Images courtesy Magali Reus; The Approach, London and Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich/New York. Photo © Lewis Ronald. 

    Press Release:

    This spring the South London Gallery presents the first institutional solo exhibition in London by Dutch artist Magali Reus (b.1981).

    Titled As mist, description, the exhibition comprises an extensive new body of work co-commissioned with Bergen Kunsthall, Norway, and reconfigured for the SLG’s main space within a bespoke architectural framework.

    Magali Reus creates sculptural forms, often made in series. Her works are subtly suggestive of familiar machines or apparatus whose function and identity remains intentionally ambiguous. At the SLG, a new body of meticulously produced sculptures is presented in spatial chapters and designed to appear in a state of transition – frozen in progress, caught mid-function, or in a state of restoration, ruin or abandonment. Images and their representative materials are seen to move transformed between different chemical states. Visual elements are reproduced, layered
    and repeated in works that are individually crafted using complex casting, moulding and weaving techniques, pitting the aggressive emptiness of manufacture against the slow diligence of handiwork.

    Magali Reus says of her sculptural forms: “Their formwork is engineered, their skins taut with the cold precision of industrial mass production, meaning that each component detail carries the suggestion of importance.”

    The exhibition opens with Crane, 2017, a large, pastel-coloured desk-like composition. Reminiscent of a façade or hoarding, it suggests a site under construction. Like a reference manual, this work harbours smaller details and material conceits that rhyme on many surfaces across the exhibition. Over-sized, unpopulated and unmoving, Crane works like a ship whose anchor ties every subsequent gesture back to its beginning symbols.

    Works from Hwael, 2017, a series of metal sculptures, are distributed throughout the gallery to reference movement of both body and machine through urban space. Hwael employs the visual language of both classical decorative ironwork and ergonomic kit manufacture and incorporates notional weights, balances and straps. The repeated form of a backpack acts as a signifier for the human body as a nomadic creature in transit. The backpack’s internal and external faces add flourishes to this formal language, enforcing the importance of distinct character or personifying gestures within the set template.

    Reus adds: “The metal sculptures of Hwael are distributed throughout the exhibition in the rhetorical manner of a fragmented whale skeleton, proportionally analogous to the skeletal framework of the public bus.”

    Strategically positioned next to each of the gallery’s entrances or passageways, and sharing certain characteristic features with the commonplace fire extinguisher, are works from the series titled Sentinel, 2017. These wall-mounted sculptures are composed of metal work with cast, custom woven and embroidered hose-like sections. They are hung alongside shapes that appear to be in a molten or liquid state, suggesting that the heat conventionally associated with these devices was implicit in their making.

    As mist, description is accompanied by a publication with essays by Laura McLean-Ferris and Quinn Latimer, and an edition specially created by the artist for the SLG.

    Link: Magali Reus at South London Gallery

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 6:04 AM on 12 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Greengrassi, London, , Vincent Fecteau   

    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi 

    Greengrassi

    Artist: Vincent Fecteau

    Venue: greengrassi, London

    Date: April 13 – June 16, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Greengrassi

    Greengrassi

    Greengrassi

    Full gallery of images and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi
    Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi

    Images courtesy of greengrassi, London. Photos by Marcus Leith.

    Link: Vincent Fecteau at greengrassi

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 11:45 AM on 21 April, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Eloise Hawser, , London, Somerset House,   

    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House 

    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House

    Artist: Eloise Hawser

    Venue: Somerset House, London

    Exhibition Title: By the Deep, By the Mark

    Date: January 31 – April 22, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House

    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House


    Eloise Hawser, excerpt of Safer Navigation, 2018, eight channel video.

     

    Full gallery of videos, images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Videos:


    Eloise Hawser, Wall Shear Stress, Velocity, and Pressure in a Human Aortic Model, 2018, video.


    Eloise Hawser, Ring Vortex Sequence, 2018, video.

     

    Images:

    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House
    Eloise Hawser at Somerset House

    Video and images courtesy of the artist and Somerset House, London and VI, VII, Oslo. Photos by Tim Bowditch.

    Press Release:

    From feats of engineering to forces of nature, Eloise Hawser explores connections between hidden flows of the city’s subterranean structures and the circulation in our bodies, with works including never-seen-before modern medical equipment and original multidisciplinary artworks by Hawser.

    Somerset House is delighted to announce a major exhibition by Somerset House Studios artist Eloise Hawser. The show will be the first of its kind to examine connections between civil engineering and cutting-edge medical imaging devices, never before seen in an exhibition context. During her residency at Somerset House Studios, Hawser has taken inspiration from the site’s history and influential position on the river, adding a site-specific element to the work. Visitors are offered an insight into Hawser’s unique creative practice as well as hidden elements of Somerset House’s and London’s social and engineering history, which has impacted on individual bodies and the community as a whole.

    The exhibition will chart relationships between extraordinary feats of civil engineering and the intricate inner workings of the human body. A collection of multidisciplinary elements, brought together by Eloise Hawser through research and original works, comprises of sculptures, collage, video simulations, sound art installations, archival imagery and fully functional medical imaging ‘phantoms’. This will be the first time phantoms, a crucial part of modern medical practice, will be shown in a creative setting. Phantoms are specially designed objects used to test medical imaging equipment such as X-Rays, MRI and CT scanners in place of a human. In keeping with Hawser’s interest in object functionality, the phantoms can take many shapes, but their purpose is to mimic human tissue and bodily functions. A highlight of the show will include an innovative sculptural piece, which places disparate phantom objects together to create a human form, suggesting the human body as an extension of the engineering systems that support life in the city. Hawser has drawn on many different industries to bring together objects which, once taken out of their original utilitarian context and placed within an artistic setting, allow other stories to come to the fore.

    Eloise Hawser: By the deep, by the mark is based on two years of extensive research by the artist and draws upon Somerset House’s close relationship with the Thames and the Embankment. The title of the exhibition By the deep, by the mark refers to the historic ways of measuring depths of water by hand using a weighted line. This method was used to calculate the depths of the Thames, including the tidal region adjoining Somerset House. The exhibition features archival images, showing how the river once flowed right into the building.

    Hawser charts how improved understanding of our bodies and health has also affected advances in civil engineering, such as the 19th-century cholera epidemic leading to Joseph Bazalgette’s ground-breaking sewer system and the contemporary Thames Tideway ‘Super Sewer’ project. With these modernisations, our health was better protected, highlighted in a sculpture made through a mixture of industrial processes, showing the transition between the two sewer systems, and in a series of images developed by the artist linking medical imaging of the body with the flow of the river.

    Hawser further explores how these engineering developments have re-evaluated our relationship with the river and demonstrates its move from an industrial route to a place for leisure. A new multi-screen video piece will immerse visitors in a digital boat trip down the Thames accompanied by an original sound art installation.

    By drawing together two seemingly unrelated areas of research, Hawser’s work suggests a correlation between preserving the communal body (through civil engineering) and individual bodies (through modern medicine) against the urban environment. By reanimating the past and mapping the present, Hawser will present both of these industries as the result of our fear of pollution and disease and the desire for control and knowledge of our bodies.

    Marie McPartlin, Director of Somerset House Studios, said:

    “A year on from the launch of Somerset House Studios, we’re delighted to announce the first large-scale exhibition from a resident artist at Somerset House. The culmination of a lengthy research project into urban space and unusual collections supported by the Studios, the exhibition traverses engineering, mapping and technologies old and new. Reflecting Somerset House’s vision to be a centre of imagination and creation, Eloise Hawser: By the deep, by the mark manifests our dedication to supporting the most exciting artists working today to make their most ambitious projects yet and presenting them as part of our programme”

    Eloise Hawser: By the deep, by the mark will be the second exhibition in the Charles Russell Speechlys Terrace Room Series, an ongoing partnership with the leading law firm to present a wide range of free exhibitions reflecting the broad interests of both organisations. This exhibition is also supported by the Port of London Authority, with help from HR Wallingford.

    Link: Eloise Hawser at Somerset House

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 9:07 AM on 20 April, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , London, Project Native Informant, Sophia Al-Maria,   

    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant 

    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant

    Artist: Sophia Al-Maria

    Venue: Project Native Informant, London

    Exhibition Title: ilysm

    Date: March 2 – April 21, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant

    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant

    Sophia Al-Maria, White Man’s Bible, 2018, iPhone video, 2 minutes 21 seconds

    Full gallery of images, videos, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant
    Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant

    Videos:

    Sophia Al-Maria, Mirror Cookie, 2018,HD video installation, 7 minutes 25 seconds

     

    Sophia Al-Maria, Major Motions, 2018, HD video installation, 16 seconds

     

    Images and videos courtesy of the artist and Project Native Informant, London

    Press Release:

    “I’m not really in reality.” – Bai Ling

    “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.”― Audre Lorde

    Chinese-American actress Bai Ling (The Crow, Sharknado 5: Global Swarming, Entourage, Wild Wild West) is the protagonist of the new suite of works that make up ilysm. This show picks up where Al-Maria’s first solo show Virgin With a Memory* left off, taking a person’s lived experience in the entertainment business as a starting point.

    For Project Native Informant, Al-Maria sought to work with an actor who is a veteran and survivor of the misogyny industrial complex of Hollywood. Inspired by Bai’s apparent indifference to the racism, homophobia and sexism of the violent gaze she is subjected to in social and tabloid media, the works in ilysm invite Bai to explore the boundaries of the in-screen matrix she occupies. The presentation seeks to free her public persona from the abjection projected onto her in the popular imagination of tabloids such as TMZ whose stock-in-trade is to troll.

    A fan of Bai Ling’s blog since the early 2000s, Al-Maria was curious about a recurring motif in Bai’s posts referencing ‘cookie’. For a long time Sophia assumed that this ‘cookie’ was a person, perhaps a secret lover. But in fact Bai was writing positive, loving self-affirmations. The installation Mirror Cookie (2018) takes a collection of Bai’s ‘cookies’ and organizes them into a disjointed monologue referencing the self-help practice of ‘mirror work’. This slowly becomes an impassioned improvisation delivered directly to camera, as if the fourth wall she is breaking is a reflection.

    In 2005 Bai became the first Asian woman to be on the cover of Playboy. However this was allegedly the reason George Lucas cut her from his film Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith. The piece White Man’s Bible (Revenge Porn) (2018) references this moment in Bai’s career. Major Motions (2018) is a fictional studio ident preceding a film we will never see. Bai holds the torch of self-love (a Hitachi Magic Wand) as a prophylactic against shame. And Not Really in Reality Reality TV (2018) is a surreal interview with Bai cast as a ‘love goddess’ being interviewed on the subject of vengefulness.

    Major Motions, Mirror Cookie and Not Really in Reality Reality TV are co-produced with Anna Lena Films.

    * In 2011 Sophia began work on a genre film derived from experiences of systemic sexual violence endemic in Cairo. However the development process became an ironic reflection of the fictional narrative when the misogyny the feature was attacking ultimately destroyed the project. From the arrest, scapegoating and public shaming in the media of one of the actresses cast, to the producer secretly shooting a ’sexy trailer’ for the film with the lead actress, Al-Maria finally abandoned the film after having upper class male ‘revolutionaries’ in the Egyptian film industry claim the story was not appropriate when ‘real violence’ was happening in the streets and white male screenwriters discouraged Al-Maria from using violence during a workshop at an American screenwriting lab. Ultimately this led to a period of doubt and disillusionment. The remnants of this failure composed the exhibition Virgin with a Memoryat Cornerhouse, Manchester.

    Link: Sophia Al-Maria at Project Native Informant

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
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