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  • MaximillianGroup 3:17 PM on 26 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , art residency, art residency in LA, , , artist in residence, , , , , contemporary art, , , francisco alvarado, , , , , , , Robert Soffian, shoebox pr, , Shoebox Projects. Brewery, , The Brewery artist lofts   

    Francisco Alvarado and Robert Soffian at Shoebox Projects 

    Francisco Alvarado and Robert Soffian at Shoebox Projects. Photo credit: Kristine Schomaker.

    Francisco Alvarado and Robert Soffian: Two Artists Riff at Shoebox Projects

    By Genie Davis

    Like two jazz musicians riffing off each other’s guitar licks, artists Francisco Alvarado and Robert Soffian created Coexistence, one terrific show at Shoebox Projects.

    Shaping an installation from solo works and one insightful shared work, the two artists said they’d planned a conversation and exploration of new materials and techniques. That they accomplished that is a given, but Alvarado and Soffian provided something more, an insight into the work of two masters of their form. They created their work on site, inviting visitors and viewers in to watch them shaping works that defy the short weeks it took to make them. In their statement about the show, they say “meaning is in meeting.” Both artists are prolific on their own, but working in tandem, they were even more inspired.

    At the closing reception, the artists invited viewers to use some of the same tools they did to create art, such as stamps, symbols, and an iPad. The inclusiveness of the show was not simply a literal interactive process, but one in which viewers wandered the tightly filled exhibition space taking in the plethora of color and form, absorbing the vivid images the way one lies on the beach in the sun – or used to, before we knew how terrible that was for us – enjoying the heat and the light.

    Born in Ecuador, Alvarado says his work reflects “life experiences through…colorful abstractions.” Inspired by nature, travel, and flora and fauna, he uses vibrant colors and well-shaped patterns, working in a variety of mediums from acrylic paint to digital imaging. Some of the works on display at Shoebox Projects included pieces that combined painting and digital art. Alvarado works primarily in acrylic, and has said that he inserts texture in his work “by adding dots and lines…” noting that in his work he often creates “happy pieces,” some of which have the qualities of Matisse. His works are powerful and even daring.

    Like Alvarado, Soffian uses bright colors and bold shapes, but his are perhaps more amorphous. He says he sees his art as a mythology and he creates his paintings as “psychic landscapes.” A former incarnation found Soffian working as a theater and lighting director for 40 years, and he finds himself still influenced by the idea of telling stories and visual improvisation, as well as a “negotiation between the formal qualities of paint and the conceptual.” The artist says that he wants to “paint things we all know or dream.” He works in a variety of formats, and has recently begun to incorporate elements of collage as well as oil, dye, and gouache.

    The single shared work that Alvarado and Soffian created together for the show was accomplished in a true collaborative fashion: they each were allowed “15 minutes of work, no less, no more” on the piece, Alvarado says. The end result was an amalgam of colors and shapes, Soffian’s more swirled, delicate, almost transitional; Alvarado’s more fully formed and bright. It was a beautiful concoction, swirling with motion and overlapping forms. A rich peach color seems to grow, unruly, from a more stylized burgundy shape dotted with small golden circles; it is a gestation, a just-this-side of tumultuous universe being born.

    Francisco Alvarado and Robert Soffian at Shoebox Projects. Photo credit: Kristine Schomaker.

    An almost-mural sized work by Soffian dominated one wall of the exhibition, with figurative shapes emerging from the passionate and colorful disarray: a skinny black cat, a large reaching white hand. Every inch of this large-scale piece was crammed with motion and pattern, a quilt bursting with life.

    On the adjoining wall, Alvarado hung a series of works, a green tree ripe with light and dotted with what could be fruit; works that looked like close-ups of cacti and more alien plants, the green tongue of one plant, circled in rich midnight blue, covered with small pink circles, blazed against a yellow and hot-pink background. Above these images were hung a series of smaller digital works, formed using similar patterns, but more diminutive.

    Opposite walls alternated the works of both artists; geometric patterns in predominantly gold and rose from Alvarado looked as if jazz rhythms were manifesting themselves on paper. Next to it, a piece by Soffian gave us alien life forms in grey and rich blue, while a curvy peach nude figure emerges near shapes that could be hieroglyphics.

    This was a joyous show, and a complex one, with images that vibrated and pulsed with energy. Two very different artists, both visually depicting the music of life in their heads and hearts. A blissful duet.

    Watch for the work of both these artists ahead, and don’t miss a show at Shoebox Projects, where transformations and collaborations – coexistences, perhaps –regularly take place.

    https://shoeboxprojects.com






































     
  • MaximillianGroup 11:35 PM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: contemporary art, ,   

    Calm 

    Calm submitted by /u/FantasticAnalysis9
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  • MaximillianGroup 1:12 PM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: contemporary art, ,   

    Philippe Vergne Resigns as Director of Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles 

    Philippe Vergne Resigns as Director of Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles submitted by /u/cameronj
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  • MaximillianGroup 10:28 AM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: contemporary art, ,   

    Hyperallergic, at Age 9, Rivals the Arts Journalism of Legacy Media 

    Hyperallergic, at Age 9, Rivals the Arts Journalism of Legacy Media submitted by /u/cameronj
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  • MaximillianGroup 8:38 AM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: alexandra grant, , , , , , , , , , art success, , , , , , , contemporary art, , Dan Callis, Diane Rosenstein Fine Art, Diane Rosenstein Gallery, , , , Gisela Colon, , , Jason Vass Gallery, , , , , Man Graves, multi media art, , , , Rachel Lachowicz, , , shoshana wayne, Shoshana Wayne Gallery, , , succesful artists, success, success in art, , , what is success   

    Six Artists Define Success 

    Alexandra Grant, Antigone is you and me. Photo courtesy of the artist.

    Why am I Doing This Again? Six Artists Define Success

    By Sydney Walters

    Every day an artist chooses to renegotiate societal structures in order to make their creative habit a profession. Because this kind of exercise drastically differs from the reliability of structured professions which grant dependable income, artists must also calibrate what it means to be personally successful. As every artist has a different studio practice, likewise his or her means of measuring success is different. Below, six seasoned artists weigh in on what success means for them.

    Alexandra Grant:

    While I was in graduate school I looked around me at the other artists and art students. I wanted to answer to the following questions: “What do I care about when no one is here? What do I care about when everyone is here?” As a graduate student, now 20 years ago, I realized that the response to each needed to be the same thing. It seemed to me that people who had long-lasting careers had aligned their inner and outer lives in a way that was authentic. In graduate school, my answer to what I cared about privately and publicly was reading and literature. Those two activities are still at the heart of what I do.”

    So I would recommend to any young or young-at-heart artist to ask themselves what they care about, both when nobody is there, and when everyone is there, and do their best to align these answers.

    Alexandra Grant is a Los Angeles based painter, draftswomen, and sculptor specializing in collaborations. She received her MFA from California College of Arts in 2000 and has been featured at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), the 2010 California Biennial of Art at the Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) and many more. Additional information and portfolio at http://www.alexandragrant.com


    Mab Graves:

    Success has never really been a motivator for me…I create for personal happiness. It’s an amazing feeling knowing others also like what I do, but I’d be doing the same things I do now even if no one liked them and I needed to work a second job to pay bills. I live a pretty quiet life and I only leave the house a few times a month, so I think success is probably still the same for me: success is a feeling. It’s like an inner glee- a bubbling inside when I know I’m creating something “right”. When a piece comes together perfectly and I get a huge sense of peace. I’m always striving to elevate my craft and get better, so the success bar raises each year, but the feeling is still the same.

    Mab Graves is a Contemporary Pop-Surrealist artist and illustrator based in Indiana. She is a self-taught artist and has been shown in galleries nationally and internationally and published her first book in 2013. Additional information, portfolio and online shop at http://www.mabgraves.com



    Rachel Lachowicz:

    I was very young when I first started showing.  Looking back I was trying to stay alive so selling work, getting a review or an exhibition was success.

    Now I am more invested intellectually and what amounts to success is far more simple.

    Rachel Lachowicz is a Los Angeles based artist whose professional career has spanned over thirty years of work that has been featured at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Israel Museum in Jerusalem and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and many more. She received her BFA from California Institute of the Arts and is currently the chair of the Art Department at Claremont Graduate University. www.lachowicz.com



    Camilla Taylor :

    Initially, success meant making your income entirely from art. I’ve revisited this definition as I know few in the LA area who are able to live off of art alone–nearly all the artists I look up to also have day jobs of some kind.  I make art that is frankly depressing to many people, and I don’t know that I’ll ever sell enough to live on it alone.

    At the graduate school I attended, there was a sign up in the print shop that just said, “Do a better job.”  I’ve replicated it in my own studio, as it is the best advice. So, success, am I doing a better job than I was before?  Have I improved my exhibitions, personal discipline, studio output, conceptual frameworks? If not, then “do a better job.”

    Camilla Taylor received her MFA from California State University at Long Beach with an emphasis in printmaking. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally and when she is not in the studio, she teaches people the art of printmaking at colleges and schools. For additional information, visit http://www.Camilla-taylor.com



    Dan Callis:

    It has become far more expansive and simple. It is so much bigger then the way it is talked about in Art School. Those conversations are wonderful and so very necessary. Success does have to do with those things but it is so much more.

    Success is your continued excitement (and occasional dread)  and sense of necessity to make your work. It is the delight to be the first viewer and the impulse to share it with another. It is the realization that it is all a profound gift. And it is a lot of fucking hard work. It is being in a community where who you are and the work you do matters and that the community in turn matters to you. To know and be known, in your work and outside your work. It is the realization that you are part of something much bigger then you and the work you do. Success is the urge to stop writing and get back to making.

    After receiving his MFA from Claremont Graduate School, now Claremont Graduate University, Dan Callis has gone on to have shows in the United States and abroad. Besides teaching at Biola University, Callis maintains an art studio in Orange County and has recently exhibited his paintings at Jason Vass Gallery in Los Angeles. www.dancallisart.com



    Gisela Colon:

    Success is a state of mind…mind over matter.

    Gisela Colon is a Los Angeles based artist who has developed an art practice of “organic minimalism.” Her unique Pods, Slabs, and Monoliths are in the permanent collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio and many more. To see her portfolio and for additional information, visit http://www.giselacolon.com



     

     
  • MaximillianGroup 4:59 PM on 24 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , contemporary art, , , , ,   

    Playing with Plato 

    The entryway to the exhibition Plato in L.A.: Contemporary Artists' Visions at the Getty Villa. Visible through a doorway on the left is Jeff Koons's Play-Doh and visible through the far right doorway is Michelangelo Pistoletto's La Habana–Venere Cubana.Plato. The founder of Western philosophy. An authority in the canon so essential to the way Westerners think about thinking that it is difficult to imagine philosophy today without the foundation he established.

    Play-Doh. A colorful, clay-like material that kids mold into whatever shape they can imagine.

    Other than a similarity of pronunciation, it might seem that Plato and Play-Doh couldn’t be more different, right?

    The artists of the Plato in L.A.: Contemporary Artists’ Visions exhibition at the Getty Villa (April 18–September 3, 2018) might not see it that way. As Paul Chan puts it in the exhibition’s companion book, there is a certain “playfulness” to Plato.

    Getty Iris

     
  • MaximillianGroup 11:56 AM on 24 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Anne Walsh, , , , , , Art and Technology, , , , , , , Beall Center, Beall Center for Art and Technology, , contemporary art, , , , Ian Ingram, , Juan Fontanive, , , , Lynn Aldrich, , , Richard Ross, , , UC Irvine, UCI, University of California, University of California Irvine, Victoria Vesna   

    It Passes like a Thought at Beall Center for Art & Technology 

    It Passes Like a Thought Beall Center for Art and Technology on the UCI campus. Photo Courtesy of the gallery.

    It Passes like a Thought: A Celebration of Winged Things

    Beall Center for Art and Technology on the UCI campus in Irvine.
    Through May 26

     

    By Genie Davis

     

    Birds –the grace of their flight, the joy of their song, their symbolic freedom. Closing at Beall Center for Art and Technology on the UCI campus in Irvine May 26th, It Passes Like a Thought is a joyous and thoughtful exhibition featuring the work of Lynn Aldrich, Juan Fontanive, Ian Ingram, Richard Ross, Susan Silton, Victoria Vesna, and Anne Walsh.

    The works here are as beautiful as they are soaring, some whimsical, some carefully even studiously detailed. On view is the emerald head of Ian Ingram’s robotic bird, “The Woodiest,” both charming and amusing, crafted from electronics and plastic and mounted on a birch. You will also see the large-scale collection of Lynn Aldrich’s “Flying Lessons: The Birds of America,” found book pages painted over in gold leaf, arranged in a fluttering grid, a work both haunting and elliptical.

    I was reminded several times in the exhibition of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale, The Nightingale, in which an emperor prefers the song of a jewel encrusted mechanical bird to that of a real nightingale. But when dying, it is the real bird that comes to sing and offer succor. Our substitutions and experiments with mechanized birds cannot replace the real thing.

    Much of the work here is pure poetry, even the title, culled appropriately from John James Audubon’s description of a single bird in flight: “When an individual is seen gliding through the woods and close to the observer, it passes like a thought…”

    Curated graciously by David Familian, the exhibition offers works in a variety of mediums, and encompasses birdsong, flight, habits, and endangerment in a cohesive, immersive space.

    The robotic wonder of Ingram’s “The Woodiest” is a double-headed woodpecker that effectively imitates the ritual used by a real North American woodpecker to lure its mate. A video is projected next to the piece showing the work attached to a tree in a forest; the reaction of a real woodpecker is seen in the video. It seems like a lighthearted prank in a way, as well as an homage to the real bird.

    Victoria Vesna’s “Bird Song Mimic,” is a beautiful installation with a sound dome that allows viewers to listen and respond to recordings of bird song. It’s a magical experience, produced by Vesna’s collaboration with a biologist, a physicist and an engineer. Interactive in nature, the piece allows a computer program to evaluate the accuracy of participants’ responses to the bird calls.

    Perhaps my new two favorite pieces in the exhibition – not that each wasn’t quite absorbing in its own winged way – are Juan Fontanive’s “Ornithology” and Lynn Aldrich’s, “Flying Lessons: The Birds of America.” With “Orinthology,” Fontanive has created a small stainless steel box, mounted on the wall, with illustrations of birds from the 18th and 19th century powered in to motion by a clock mechanism. The illustrations are spun in the fashion of a flipbook, speeded so that in seeing the bird’s wings in flight, the viewer also hears a fluttering sound, as if the wings were flapping.

    Aldrich’s work is a fascinating revision. She is also using illustrations, here, pages from John James Audubon’s The Birds of America, which she has painted over entirely, with the exception of the birds’ wings. The beautiful feathers seem fragile and haunting, so impermanent and yet magnificent set against the gold. Another work by Aldrich uses computer printouts in swooping strands. Suspended from the ceiling, they drop into an empty bird cage; the printouts contain lists of endangered and extinct birds.

    Other works in the show include a film by Susan Silton documenting a whistling language based on birdcalls; Anne Walsh’s “Parrot Suite,” a video which depicts a plush robotic parrot and an ultimately amusing exploration of mimicry; and the truly lovely yet somber photographs of Richard Ross, depicting taxidermied birds, a memorial of sorts to their stilled flight.

    The exhibition gives us a stark reminder, there are 9,000 avian species, many are endangered. It also serves as a potent reminder of just how precious and really wondrous birds are, and how – just as the Emperor learned in “The Nightingale” – a mechanical bird is no substitute for the real and beautiful being that passes like a thought.

    While birds may well arrive more quickly, this exhibition is well worth the drive to Orange County.

    http://www.beallcenter.uci.edu















     

     
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