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  • MaximillianGroup 3:17 PM on 26 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , art residency, art residency in LA, , , artist in residence, , , , , , , , francisco alvarado, , , , , , , Robert Soffian, shoebox pr, , Shoebox Projects. Brewery, , The Brewery artist lofts   

    Francisco Alvarado and Robert Soffian at Shoebox Projects 

    Francisco Alvarado and Robert Soffian at Shoebox Projects. Photo credit: Kristine Schomaker.

    Francisco Alvarado and Robert Soffian: Two Artists Riff at Shoebox Projects

    By Genie Davis

    Like two jazz musicians riffing off each other’s guitar licks, artists Francisco Alvarado and Robert Soffian created Coexistence, one terrific show at Shoebox Projects.

    Shaping an installation from solo works and one insightful shared work, the two artists said they’d planned a conversation and exploration of new materials and techniques. That they accomplished that is a given, but Alvarado and Soffian provided something more, an insight into the work of two masters of their form. They created their work on site, inviting visitors and viewers in to watch them shaping works that defy the short weeks it took to make them. In their statement about the show, they say “meaning is in meeting.” Both artists are prolific on their own, but working in tandem, they were even more inspired.

    At the closing reception, the artists invited viewers to use some of the same tools they did to create art, such as stamps, symbols, and an iPad. The inclusiveness of the show was not simply a literal interactive process, but one in which viewers wandered the tightly filled exhibition space taking in the plethora of color and form, absorbing the vivid images the way one lies on the beach in the sun – or used to, before we knew how terrible that was for us – enjoying the heat and the light.

    Born in Ecuador, Alvarado says his work reflects “life experiences through…colorful abstractions.” Inspired by nature, travel, and flora and fauna, he uses vibrant colors and well-shaped patterns, working in a variety of mediums from acrylic paint to digital imaging. Some of the works on display at Shoebox Projects included pieces that combined painting and digital art. Alvarado works primarily in acrylic, and has said that he inserts texture in his work “by adding dots and lines…” noting that in his work he often creates “happy pieces,” some of which have the qualities of Matisse. His works are powerful and even daring.

    Like Alvarado, Soffian uses bright colors and bold shapes, but his are perhaps more amorphous. He says he sees his art as a mythology and he creates his paintings as “psychic landscapes.” A former incarnation found Soffian working as a theater and lighting director for 40 years, and he finds himself still influenced by the idea of telling stories and visual improvisation, as well as a “negotiation between the formal qualities of paint and the conceptual.” The artist says that he wants to “paint things we all know or dream.” He works in a variety of formats, and has recently begun to incorporate elements of collage as well as oil, dye, and gouache.

    The single shared work that Alvarado and Soffian created together for the show was accomplished in a true collaborative fashion: they each were allowed “15 minutes of work, no less, no more” on the piece, Alvarado says. The end result was an amalgam of colors and shapes, Soffian’s more swirled, delicate, almost transitional; Alvarado’s more fully formed and bright. It was a beautiful concoction, swirling with motion and overlapping forms. A rich peach color seems to grow, unruly, from a more stylized burgundy shape dotted with small golden circles; it is a gestation, a just-this-side of tumultuous universe being born.

    Francisco Alvarado and Robert Soffian at Shoebox Projects. Photo credit: Kristine Schomaker.

    An almost-mural sized work by Soffian dominated one wall of the exhibition, with figurative shapes emerging from the passionate and colorful disarray: a skinny black cat, a large reaching white hand. Every inch of this large-scale piece was crammed with motion and pattern, a quilt bursting with life.

    On the adjoining wall, Alvarado hung a series of works, a green tree ripe with light and dotted with what could be fruit; works that looked like close-ups of cacti and more alien plants, the green tongue of one plant, circled in rich midnight blue, covered with small pink circles, blazed against a yellow and hot-pink background. Above these images were hung a series of smaller digital works, formed using similar patterns, but more diminutive.

    Opposite walls alternated the works of both artists; geometric patterns in predominantly gold and rose from Alvarado looked as if jazz rhythms were manifesting themselves on paper. Next to it, a piece by Soffian gave us alien life forms in grey and rich blue, while a curvy peach nude figure emerges near shapes that could be hieroglyphics.

    This was a joyous show, and a complex one, with images that vibrated and pulsed with energy. Two very different artists, both visually depicting the music of life in their heads and hearts. A blissful duet.

    Watch for the work of both these artists ahead, and don’t miss a show at Shoebox Projects, where transformations and collaborations – coexistences, perhaps –regularly take place.

    https://shoeboxprojects.com






































     
  • MaximillianGroup 5:12 AM on 26 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Aspen, , , Julia Dault, Marianne Boesky,   

    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky 

    Julia Dault at Marianne Boeseky

    Artist: Julia Dault

    Venue: Marianne Boesky, Aspen

    Exhibition Title: More Than Words

    Date: April 26 – June 9, 2018

    Click here to view slideshow

    20180426-Boesky-011

    Julia Dault at Marianne Boeseky

    Julia Dault at Marianne Boeseky

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
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    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
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    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
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    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
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    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky
    Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky

    Images courtesy of the artist and Marianne Boesky, New York/Aspen. Photos by Object Studies. 

    Press Release:

    Marianne Boesky Gallery is pleased to present More Than Words, Julia Dault’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. The exhibition will feature a new series of sculptures as well as new paintings that, together, capture Dault’s iterative play with color, form, texture, and materials, as well as her ongoing exploration of the creative potential of industrial products. The new works underscore the value of engaging with the intricate, often beautiful, and little-considered systems that lie just beyond any given surface. This idea is also encapsulated in the exhibition title, which references Extreme’s 1991 hit song of the same name and continues Dault’s use of pop culture references in her work.

    Dault is driven by the boundless creative and formal possibilities within the confines of self-imposed rules, which are often determined by the materials and tools with which she is working. This sense of discovery in the seemingly constrained led to Dault’s newest sculptures: abstract compositions inspired by the intricate fretworks of brightly colored PEX tubing that comprise the plumbing systems in our homes and workspaces. This new engagement broadens Dault’s explorations of the tools and materials of other trades exemplified by earlier sculptures made with off-the-shelf Formica and Plexiglas.

    Dault experimented with the polyethylene PEX tubing in her studio, examining what geometric forms emerged as she bent and shaped the material. She then fabricated the sculptures in vividly colored, hand-rolled aluminum, creating patterns that resemble imagined engineering plans and maps of urban spaces. Hung on the wall, the new works reveal the aesthetic potential of these little-considered industrial materials. At the same time, the minimalist forms hearken back to the 1970s-era works of Anthony Caro and Frank Stella, continuing her engagement with the art of the postwar to the postmodern period.

    The exhibition will also feature more than a dozen new paintings that expand on Dault’s interest in layering, patterning, and the interdependence of color and form. As Dault applies and removes coatings of paint with brushes, sponges, combs, and other unconventional tools, new details and optical illusions arise. For example, Total Recall (2017) features a patterned velour atop Dault’s composition of blue and yellow forms; as the viewer moves around it, like a lenticular print, the fabric changes color and appears to rise from the surface. Dault creates similarly unexpected experiences through her use of woven and perforated vinyls and meshes.

    Dault’s experimentations with surface, tactility, geometry, color, and expressive juxtapositions infuse her paintings with vibrant energy that compel the viewer to look closely and discover unexpected moments of visual complexity. As the systems that underpin modern life become more complex, and, by extension, more opaque, Dault’s artworks provide an invitation to engage actively with our everyday surroundings. Quoting philosopher William James, Dault infers: “My experience is what I agree to attend to. Only those items which I notice shape my mind.”

    Link: Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 11:35 PM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Calm 

    Calm submitted by /u/FantasticAnalysis9
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  • MaximillianGroup 2:02 PM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Angela Stief, , , Evelyne Axell, , , KÖNIG GALERIE   

    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE 

    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE

    Artist: Evelyne Axell

    Venue: KÖNIG GALERIE, Berlin

    Exhibition Title: Venus, Leda & Mona Lisa

    Date: April 28 – June 2, 2018

    Curated by: Angela Stief

    Click here to view slideshow

    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE

    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE

    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE

    Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

    Images:

    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
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    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
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    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
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    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
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    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE
    Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE

    Images courtesy of KÖNIG GALERIE, Berlin

    Press Release:

    “My world, for all its aggressiveness, is brimming with unconditional zest for life. My motif is clear: Nudity and femininity represent the utopia of a bio-botanical freedom – a freedom, which is immune to frustration and gradual repression, a freedom, which tolerates only the limits, it sets for itself.” Evelyne Axell

    Evelyne Axell’s (1935 – 1972) work has reached cult status. Her work can be seen as one of the highlights of pop art – an art form, whose protagonists only gradually find recognition. Despite being on exhibition in renowned institutions such as Centre Pompidou in Paris, Tate Modern in London, Brooklyn Museum in New York and Kunsthalle Wien, Axell’s work is representative of an era whose potential is only recently being acknowledged.

    In the late 60s and early 70s, the Belgian artist, who worked under the name Axell in order to obscure her gender, developed a subversive imagery that oscillates between female actionism and seduction and unfolds a protofeminist force. Strong women, like the first female astronaut Walentina Tereschkowa or the US activist Angela Davis, dominate the artist’s imagery. As hinted at in the exhibition title, Axell engages with both contemporary stereotypes of femininity as well as centuries old role ascriptions and correctively intervenes in persistent gender relations: reflecting on art history – such as Venus iconography, Leda with the Swan depictions and distinguished portraits like Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa – she subverts historically sedimented, male perceptions of femininity and renegotiates the socially constructed image of women as either ‘angel in the house’ or femme-fatale.

    The duplication and repetition of the female nude and the reclaiming of the depicted body – as can be seen in the artist’s self-portraits – deconstruct the dominant rules of authorship: Axell switches sides and trades her role as muse for that of producer. In Le peintre (1971) she confidently inserts herself into a fictive genealogy of self-portraits, demonstrating a natural-seeming joy at making art. Axell’s view towards masculinity is a critical one. She shows men as voyeurs, depicts the male gender as symbolically reduced, and ironically pokes fun at macho behavior. The status symbol ‘car’, for instance, is a recurring theme in Axell’s work; one that she subjects to a symbolic reconfiguration: In Axell-ération (1965) a woman in red high-heels has her foot on the pedal and Changement de vitesse (1965) shows a woman’s naked calves enveloping the gearshift. In Auto-stop (1965), a work gesturing towards Diego Velázquez’s La Venus del Espejo, the artist scrutinizes the power dynamic inherent in the gaze.

    Art, for Axell, evolved into a weapon of provocative self-empowerment, which she yielded against the objectification of women in post-war society. Her protofeminist imagery, which draws on pop’s depiction of reality as heavily mediatized and therefore ultimately constructed, seeks representation of women’s perspectives and female desire. At least until actual gender equality is achieved, Axell’s sensual impetus will remain culturally and politically relevant.

    Link: Evelyne Axell at KÖNIG GALERIE

    Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group , a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

    Contemporary Art Daily

     
  • MaximillianGroup 1:12 PM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Philippe Vergne Resigns as Director of Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles 

    Philippe Vergne Resigns as Director of Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles submitted by /u/cameronj
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  • MaximillianGroup 10:28 AM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Hyperallergic, at Age 9, Rivals the Arts Journalism of Legacy Media 

    Hyperallergic, at Age 9, Rivals the Arts Journalism of Legacy Media submitted by /u/cameronj
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  • MaximillianGroup 8:38 AM on 25 May, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: alexandra grant, , , , , , , , , , art success, , , , , , , , , Dan Callis, Diane Rosenstein Fine Art, Diane Rosenstein Gallery, , , , Gisela Colon, , , Jason Vass Gallery, , , , , Man Graves, multi media art, , , , Rachel Lachowicz, , , shoshana wayne, Shoshana Wayne Gallery, , , succesful artists, success, success in art, , , what is success   

    Six Artists Define Success 

    Alexandra Grant, Antigone is you and me. Photo courtesy of the artist.

    Why am I Doing This Again? Six Artists Define Success

    By Sydney Walters

    Every day an artist chooses to renegotiate societal structures in order to make their creative habit a profession. Because this kind of exercise drastically differs from the reliability of structured professions which grant dependable income, artists must also calibrate what it means to be personally successful. As every artist has a different studio practice, likewise his or her means of measuring success is different. Below, six seasoned artists weigh in on what success means for them.

    Alexandra Grant:

    While I was in graduate school I looked around me at the other artists and art students. I wanted to answer to the following questions: “What do I care about when no one is here? What do I care about when everyone is here?” As a graduate student, now 20 years ago, I realized that the response to each needed to be the same thing. It seemed to me that people who had long-lasting careers had aligned their inner and outer lives in a way that was authentic. In graduate school, my answer to what I cared about privately and publicly was reading and literature. Those two activities are still at the heart of what I do.”

    So I would recommend to any young or young-at-heart artist to ask themselves what they care about, both when nobody is there, and when everyone is there, and do their best to align these answers.

    Alexandra Grant is a Los Angeles based painter, draftswomen, and sculptor specializing in collaborations. She received her MFA from California College of Arts in 2000 and has been featured at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), the 2010 California Biennial of Art at the Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) and many more. Additional information and portfolio at http://www.alexandragrant.com


    Mab Graves:

    Success has never really been a motivator for me…I create for personal happiness. It’s an amazing feeling knowing others also like what I do, but I’d be doing the same things I do now even if no one liked them and I needed to work a second job to pay bills. I live a pretty quiet life and I only leave the house a few times a month, so I think success is probably still the same for me: success is a feeling. It’s like an inner glee- a bubbling inside when I know I’m creating something “right”. When a piece comes together perfectly and I get a huge sense of peace. I’m always striving to elevate my craft and get better, so the success bar raises each year, but the feeling is still the same.

    Mab Graves is a Contemporary Pop-Surrealist artist and illustrator based in Indiana. She is a self-taught artist and has been shown in galleries nationally and internationally and published her first book in 2013. Additional information, portfolio and online shop at http://www.mabgraves.com



    Rachel Lachowicz:

    I was very young when I first started showing.  Looking back I was trying to stay alive so selling work, getting a review or an exhibition was success.

    Now I am more invested intellectually and what amounts to success is far more simple.

    Rachel Lachowicz is a Los Angeles based artist whose professional career has spanned over thirty years of work that has been featured at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Israel Museum in Jerusalem and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and many more. She received her BFA from California Institute of the Arts and is currently the chair of the Art Department at Claremont Graduate University. www.lachowicz.com



    Camilla Taylor :

    Initially, success meant making your income entirely from art. I’ve revisited this definition as I know few in the LA area who are able to live off of art alone–nearly all the artists I look up to also have day jobs of some kind.  I make art that is frankly depressing to many people, and I don’t know that I’ll ever sell enough to live on it alone.

    At the graduate school I attended, there was a sign up in the print shop that just said, “Do a better job.”  I’ve replicated it in my own studio, as it is the best advice. So, success, am I doing a better job than I was before?  Have I improved my exhibitions, personal discipline, studio output, conceptual frameworks? If not, then “do a better job.”

    Camilla Taylor received her MFA from California State University at Long Beach with an emphasis in printmaking. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally and when she is not in the studio, she teaches people the art of printmaking at colleges and schools. For additional information, visit http://www.Camilla-taylor.com



    Dan Callis:

    It has become far more expansive and simple. It is so much bigger then the way it is talked about in Art School. Those conversations are wonderful and so very necessary. Success does have to do with those things but it is so much more.

    Success is your continued excitement (and occasional dread)  and sense of necessity to make your work. It is the delight to be the first viewer and the impulse to share it with another. It is the realization that it is all a profound gift. And it is a lot of fucking hard work. It is being in a community where who you are and the work you do matters and that the community in turn matters to you. To know and be known, in your work and outside your work. It is the realization that you are part of something much bigger then you and the work you do. Success is the urge to stop writing and get back to making.

    After receiving his MFA from Claremont Graduate School, now Claremont Graduate University, Dan Callis has gone on to have shows in the United States and abroad. Besides teaching at Biola University, Callis maintains an art studio in Orange County and has recently exhibited his paintings at Jason Vass Gallery in Los Angeles. www.dancallisart.com



    Gisela Colon:

    Success is a state of mind…mind over matter.

    Gisela Colon is a Los Angeles based artist who has developed an art practice of “organic minimalism.” Her unique Pods, Slabs, and Monoliths are in the permanent collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio and many more. To see her portfolio and for additional information, visit http://www.giselacolon.com



     

     
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